Login

New Zealand's first (decimal) circulating commerative

Today the postman delivered  my first purchase from NZ post( official suppliers of collectable coins from NZ)  in years.   Its the first ever ( for decimal coinage)  circulating commemorative.  25 April  is when Kiwis remember the fallen,   its known as ANZAC day( Australia New Zealand Army Corps)  ANZAc is a term coined in the first world war. So I guess its fitting that it is the subject Of NZ's  first circulating commemorative.     I had great frustration photographing this coin. I ended up using my beam splitter,  and unfortunately the one fault of that lighting technique has occurred( look for the ghost).  I am finally going to go and buy a modern beam splitter with an anti reflective coating.  This time the ghost is fitting!!!

7 years ago

Interesting coin and post. I don't know what the mintage will be but it's a sure thing that many will be taken out of circulation. Your description of using a split lens (focus) is interesting. I'm not nearly as studied as you with photography but descriptions I read said the technique was employed to achieve deep focus or wide depth of field. I don't understand why this would be necessary for a photo of this type. The split somehow creates a ghost image which I suppose is a product of refraction. My photos of proof coin surfaces usually produce totally black areas with no surface detail. Was this the problem you were attempting to defeat? 

7 years ago

I think the coin will never be rare it will probably have mintage in the Millions.  the only other NZ circulating commemorative was in 1949;  a Half crown.   That coin is easily obtainable  and not over expensive.    I purchased two single ANZAC coins plus a coin roll.


Re the split focus  I think i have confused people with my terminology.   What I used was an "axial" lighting rig, at the heart of which is an old type Edmunds optical 50-50 beam splitter. Because of the risk of ghosting I don't use it too much,   but  this ANZAC 50 cent piece was diabolical to photograph. The coin has been coloured black( where the ghosting has occurred)  and light blue( the Maori motifs). Diffuse lighting and even a ring light hid the coloration.   The axial did the job but with the expense of the ghost.   The plate beam splitter is old and has titanium dioxide on both sides of the glass.  Modern versions  have an anti reflective coating on one side  with the specific purpose of preventing such ghosting.   I used to think axial lighting was the ultimate  in coin photography techniques  but now I only use it as last resort. the other problem is the image beam  gets bent as it passes through  the beam splitter   this reduces the resolution of the resultant image.   The technique gives top notch contrast; thats why its so popular, but with a loss in resolution. Of course only pixel peepers would notice the loss in resolution. For me the Ghosting is the more serious issue.    I will be getting a new Beam splitter  next week.     At US$ 189.00( converted from Euro)  its not a cheap item.

7 years ago

Nice Image Ian, I admire your technique it would probably get better if you worked at it harder! Just kidding I know you have made a true study of the art of photographing coins. See you in abot 8 weeks.

7 years ago

Interesting post.

7 years ago

Thanks for sharing the image of this very nice coin.  

The ANZAC forces, of course, bore the brunt of the disaster at Gallipoli, whose centennial was recently noted.  The National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., annually holds an ANZAC memorial service. I went to one about ten years ago; it was very moving.  Gallipoli represented the great blot on the career of Winston Churchill, who promoted the ill-fated venture when he was First Lord of the Admiralty.


7 years ago
We use cookies to provide users the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you agree to receive all cookies on money.org. You may disable cookies at any time using your internet browser configuration. By continuing to use this website, you agree to our privacy policy and terms of use. To learn more about how we use cookies and to review our privacy policy, click here.