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1920 Maine Centennial Half Dollar

1920 Maine Centennial Half Dollar


Purpose:


To commemorate and fund the celebration of the 100th anniversary of the admission of Maine  statehood into the Union.


 

Maximum Number Authorized: 100,000 pieces.


Sale Price: $1.00


Designs:


    Obverse – Anthony de Francisci

Arms of the state of Maine.Two male figures represent Commerce (the anchor) and Agriculture (the scythe).


Online Resource: https://www.heraldry-wiki.com/heraldrywiki/index.php/Maine_(state)  


   Reverse – Anthony de Francisci

Wreath of pine needles and cones. Within the wreath, “MAINE CENTENIAL 1820-1920” appears.


Popularity:


50,000 half dollars were struck for the public. The coins were sold through the Office of the State Treasurer. All pieces were sold. 


Maine Centennial Online Resource:  


https://digicom.bpl.lib.me.us/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1068&context=books_pubs  


Trivia:


  • Delivery of the coins from the Mint were not made until the centennial celebration was over.

  • Designer Anthony de Francisci is well known for designing the Peace dollar.

  • Moxie was designated as the official soft drink of Maine in 2005.

  • Maine became a state as part of the Missouri Compromise. To keep the balance of power equal between states, Maine entered the Union as a free state while Missouri entered as a slave state.



For more information:


Encyclopedia of the Commemorative Coins of the United States by Anthony J. Swiatek 

KWS Publishers (2012)


Commemorative Coins of the United States Identification and Price Guide by Anthony J. Swiatek

Amos Press Publishers (2001)


References:


Encyclopedia of the Commemorative Coins of the United States by Anthony J. Swiatek

KWS Publishers (2012)


The Encyclopedia of United States Silver & Gold Commemorative Coins 1892 to 1954 by Anthony Swiatek and Walter Breen

Arco Publishing, Inc. (1981)

 1920 Maine Centennial Obverse     1920 Maine Centennial Reverse


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