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25 Apr 2016

I've gone this far...so, where do I begin?

Coins-United States | lawrenceCLANmaclaren

"What coins should I collect??" Undoubtedly, I would think anyone reading this post has asked him/her self this question numerous times...

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23 Apr 2016

Mint to Release Gold Mercury dime

Coins-United States | user_42611

I was waiting for the 12:00 pm EST sales to begin and logged on to the US Mint and tried to order it then logged me off so i tried again this time i got farther but again could not complete my order then i made the mistake of calling busy signal. Bottom line i wanted 5 coins but would have settled for 1 and ended up with none. Very disappointed! Later on i called to complain the guy was very nice and told me they had sold out in just over 20 minutes he typed up my complaint and now i am interested to see what the mint says in the e-mail i am supposed to receive. I then went online and a popular COIN Company i did not use the name because i do not know if it was against any rules but everyone see's their adds anyhow they had a pre- sale NGC 70 $419.00 and $319.00 NGC 69 less for certain labels and more for others like black labels. Like my first post these large company's and tv coin shows seem to get a large amount of coins instead of the collector. How do they know how many they will get,one thing is for sure they have a large amount of people working those phones and the money to go with it. I lost this round but hope to have better luck with the Standing Liberty quarter and the Liberty Walking half or "The Walker" Some wanted these to be silver but there are laws that prevent this and in my humble opinion the gold is fitting for their 100th anniversary. The Liberty Head was beautiful example at $205.00 with the fancy OGP packaging. Some thought that was high but it is not often that the US Mint offers a true collectible with a low mintage of 125,000. Have a nice evening and happy hunting!

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15 Apr 2016

Mint to Release Gold Mercury dime

Coins-United States | user_42611

The US Mint will release the Gold Liberty Head or Mercury dime April-21-2016 and it will be 24 K 1/10 oz. gold but what surprised me is 10 coins per household and a mintage of 110,000. You would think the mint would learn and lower the per household limit to 1 or 2 so large coin networks can't buy them all up and triple the price! I still remember the 25TH Anniversary Silver Eagle sets mintage 100,000 gone in a couple hours site crashed no getting through the phone except for the fortunate ones. This is the first of 3 coins 100th anniversary to be released it is just my humble opinion that collectors should have as much of a chance as the large coin networks and i will not get started on how i feel about them! Maybe it will work out i was lucky enough to get the last 4 Chronicles sets bit i still have to wounder how many collectors buy 10 gold coins at US Mint prices? Currently the 1/10 oz gold Pr American Eagle is $175.00 and on back order? I just happen to enjoy all 3 of these coins and they are beautiful in silver and the gold coins should be interesting as well hopefully they will join my other coins we shall see. Have a great day collecting!

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13 Apr 2016

1933 Double Eagles

Coins-United States | user_9138

The U.S. government continues to deny the Langbord family ownership of Izzy Switt's 1933 Double Eagles. That is just wrong. The coins are considered collectors items since very few survived the melting pot.1913 Liberty nickels were not legally produced, yet are legal to own. There are many pattern coins sold periodically, yet they were not produced for the general public. Somehow they got out of the hands of public officials, who were supposed to give their opinion as to whether the design was fit for new coinage,and into the hands of people that sold them or for their private collections. They were never confiscated. There are many thousands of common date gold coins sold daily that should have been turned in for melting in 1933, yet they continue to be allowed to be sold and collected. Give the gold pieces back to the Langbords!

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10 Apr 2016

I just got 2 Key Date Quarters in One Day

Coins-United States | CoinCollector2012

I just picked up a 1932-D and a 1932-S quarter in the same day! Both are graded VG-10 by NGC and they are even from the same submission. Let me know what you think...

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26 Mar 2016

The Oregon Trail Memorial Half Dollar

Coins-United States | coinsbygary

The editor of “The Numismatist” in a November 1926 editorial declared that the bold and striking design of the Oregon Trail Memorial Half-Dollar was “much more appropriate for a medal than a coin”. Though the editor may have been technically correct, the collectors have had the last say as evidenced by an article by Q. David Bowers appearing in the October 1998 issue of “The Numismatist”. In that article Q. David Bowers writes that the “Society for United States Commemorative Coins” voted the Oregon Trail Memorial Half-Dollar their favorite commemorative.The design of the Oregon Trail Memorial Half-Dollar isn’t the only component of this coin that endears it to collectors. For the collector interested in the history behind the coin, and the history of the coin, this coin has something for everyone. First, without the determination of Ezra Meeker and Dr. Minnie Howard there is no Oregon Trail Memorial Half-Dollar. Ezra Meeker first traversed the Oregon trail in 1852 with his wife and newborn child and sought to raise funds in order to place markers along the trail. Dr. Minnie Howard was a resident of Pocatello, Idaho which is in close proximity to Fort Hall, a major stop along the trail. Through their efforts, Congress authorized the minting of up to 6 million coins! Then there was the mismanagement of the proceeds from the coins by the Oregon Trail Memorial Association. On top of that there was an attempt to increase sales to collectors by introducing coins with different dates and mints.[1] And if that isn’t enough there is confusion as to which is the obverse of this coin, the wagon side or the Indian side? Incidentally, the wagon side is considered to be the obverse by the US Mint while the Frasers consider the Indian side as the obverse.[2] Not lost to me amidst all these story lines is the fact that this coin represents the only collaborative work done by both James Earle and Laura Gardin Fraser. Thus, with two of that days more accomplished sculptors designing the coin it is no wonder to me why this coin is so highly regarded among collectors. Besides the obverse/reverse confusion there is confusion as to which Fraser designed which side. Conventional wisdom has that Laura designed the conestoga wagon side because animals were among her favorite subjects for sculpting and likewise James the Indian side because of his skill sculpting Indians.[3] However, Mitch Sanders writes in the July, 2013 issue of “The Numismatist” on page 105 that James designed the wagon side while Laura did the Indian. Incidentally, Laura produced the plaster models for both sides of the coin based on James and her’s drawings. Then in order to expedite production of the coins Laura had the Medallic Art Company make the hubs that she then hand carried to the Philadelphia Mint.[4]Despite all this, what I find most intriguing is the monogram on the coin’s reverse (Fraser definition). The monogram has the initials JE and LG in small letters on top of each other with one large F on the end. To me this signifies the Biblical definition of marriage that the two shall become one. Though James Earle and Laura Gardin Fraser had no children, they had a wonderful marriage that spanned 40 years and only ended with the death of James in 1953. Laura had this to say about their life together: We talked and laughed and competed all our lives. When we weren't working, we were talking, and we never grew tired of each other or ran out of subject matter to discuss or argue about. The theatre and [New York] Philharmonic were our favorite social events. We could spend literally days discussing a play or a concert. Good acting always thrilled us, as did the strength and beauty of poetic writing. Of course our own creative work was our life. It was that way to the end. A few minutes before Jimmy passed away, I sat on the edge of his bed and started talking about our doing a Lincoln. He just beamed with excitement. I didn't want him to overexert himself, so I thought I better leave. I got up and walked to the door, then turned around and looked at Jimmy. He raised his head, nodded, and looked at me, smiled and said, “By golly, Laura, we’ll do a colossal Lincoln...together!” [5]1 The Numismatist, November 2014, “Sunrise at Pocatello”2 Commemorative Coins of the United States by Q. David Bowers, Chapter 83 The Numismatist, November 2014, “Sunrise at Pocatello” 4 Commemorative Coins of the United States by Q. David Bowers, Chapter 8; The Numismatist, November 2014, “Sunrise at Pocatello”5 End of the Trail the Odyssey of a Statue by Dean Krakel Epilogue “Something more beautiful for America” Gary

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03 Mar 2016

latest purchase!

Coins-United States | Ashton

I saved up and I just purchased this beautiful 1836 half. It arrived today in the mail I'm pretty excited to own this wonderful piece of history. Just wanted to share it with you guys. also please share some of your recent acquisitions.

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01 Mar 2016

Is this an error? Please help

Coins-United States | Ashton

I found this 2015 d nickel roll hunting and noticed on the obverse of the coin was a perfect straight scratch. I flipped the coin over and there was an imprint of the reverse of a dime. the only way i would imagine something like this happening in the mint is if it was struck on top of the dime. What do you guys think?

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23 Feb 2016

A WALK INTO HISTORY

Coins-United States | Mike Burn

Just imagine designing a coin that would be legal tender for the treasury department. This happened in 1976. However the process started in October of 1973. The treasury realized that our country's bicentennial was just three year's away. So they held a contest for an average American citizen to design the obverse on three coin's.

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