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29 Sep 2020

The making of the 1960 small date

Coins-United States | CentSearcher

Hello everyone! I recently acquired two of the semi key date 1960 small date in mint state, and was fascinated by them and there history. I have not posted in a while so I thought I would discuss what I know about this coin. So without any further introduction, let's get started!1960 was only the second year for the new memorial reverse design, yet a major variety already made its appearence. The lower minted small date variety was the original die for that year, though it was replaced before the end of February. The Philedelpia mint discovered that the zero in 1960 was too small, which can cause the interior to break away in the die, which will then result in the numeral to fill in. Certain 1930 D lincoln cents and 1960 Jefferson nickels were recongnized for this mint error. The large date quickly took the place of the original die and no word of the transition was said. But before long the difference was discovered and many small date varieties were hoarded. For that reason they are easy to obtain in mint state. The rush to collect the small date cents continued on to 1964. It was recorded that some $50 face value bags of the small dates sold upwards to $12,000. The Denver mint did not make the replacement until later in the year, so that the Denver minted small dates were almost just as common as the Denver minted large date.

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29 Sep 2020

The History Of Coinage Types in the United States- The Half Cent

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Well, to put things in perspective, I think I have become older, taller, and wider on my birthday today. To celebrate, I am pushing a new set of blog posts to compliment the 50 States series I am doing. So great. Presenting the history of the Half Cent from coinfodder, who is one year older, taller, and wider.

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29 Sep 2020

Confused in Nevada

Coins-United States | Stumpy

I truly hate to post a blog with just a few questions, but this is the most efficient way to get the best feedback so please excuse me this one time. I have been talking to some of the older members and have gotten some good answers but I am still somewhat confused. I am smart enough to think I know the basic reasons for their behavior but as a former corporate manager I am still stunned by a seeming lack of acute business sense, also please keep in mind that even though I'm an older guy, I only became involved in April of this year, so I don't have any practical experience with the U.S. Mint to compare to.

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26 Sep 2020

The History of The Peace Silver Dollar Part 2

Coins-United States | s12k3

Hello guys! The topic for today’s blog is the history of the Peace Dollar. It is one of my favorite United States minted coins. If not for the Pittman Act, these coins might not have been produced! The grind for the YN Dollars continues! The Peace dollar is often overshadowed by the Morgan dollar. The roughly 1 8 7 million Peace dollars struck between 1 9 2 1 and 1 9 3 5 was a fraction of the half billion Morgan dollars struck in their time, between 1 8 7 8 and 1 9 0 4 and again in 1 9 2 1. The Peace Dollar is one of the shortest series of silver coins the U.S. Mint has ever issued with only 24 coinsCollectors are often content to have a single example of the high relief 1 9 2 1 Peace dollar and the modified, lower relief 1 9 2 2 to 1 9 3 5 issues for type purposes in their collections. There is a big difference in a regular peace dollar and a high relief peace dollar, which is a little hard to tell by the photos. Did you know the designer Anthony de Francisci based Liberty’s head off of the features of his new bride? That is a pretty cool fact. It was the first American coin that would not have been issued without a concerted push by several prominent numismatists and the American Numismatic Association. In November 1918 Frank Dufield, a numismatist, published an article in The Numismatist, the ANA’s monthly magazine, in which he suggested a circulating coin be issued to celebrate the U.S. victory in the war. Two years later prominent expert Farran Zerbe gave a speech at an ANA convention in Chicago arguing for a coin sold at face value to honor the treaties that ended the war, which he felt was especially fitting since American silver played an important role in the war.The rarest of all Peace Dollars is the 1 9 6 4 - D, as the Denver Mint struck around 3 0 0 , 0 0 0 Peace Dollars in 1 9 6 5 with the 1 9 6 4 date on the coins. Most of these were melted. In fact, it is illegal to possess a 1 9 6 4 - dated Peace dollar because they were not released to the public.Thank you for reading this blog. I hope you enjoyed it. The next blog is about the trime, a three cent coin. See you next time!

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24 Sep 2020

The Fifty States of Coinage- Trivia Quiz Part 1

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Hello folks. Today, I will test some fun numismatic knowledge from the previous 10 Fifty States of coinage. Please respond in the chat with the answer and the state that covered the answer. To make things easier, I have created a tag. So, are you ready? Winner receive bragging rights (Until the next ten comes up).1) Which company where the original owners of the Denver Mint? What coins did they strike? What was odd about some of them?

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22 Sep 2020

history of the walking liberty half dollar

Coins-United States | walking liberty

The walking liberty half dollar was made from 1916 to 1947 then replaced by the franklin half dollar. In 1915 when Robert W. Woolley came into commission he believed that when a coin design was circulating for 25 years that it had to be replaced so he set out to replace the Barber coinage. When he found people he chose Adolph A. Weinman and Herman Macneil. Herman made the standing liberty quarter and Adolph made the mercury dime and walking liberty half. The sun in the background proved difficult to perfect and even harder to strike. People believe that the "sower" design on the France coinage was his inspiration for the half dollar. Since the liberty half dollar was so hard to strike most people believe that that is the reason it got replaced by the franklin half dollar and the Treasury secretary before it was made he even considered that Barber creates his own new design for the half dollar. Many people believe the liberty half dollar was a really beautiful design but Art Historian Cornelius Vermeule considered that it was the most beautiful piece of coinage in U.S history. Since 1986 a few modifications have been made to the obverse of the coin and used as the American silver eagle, and even had its own gold centennial made in 2016.

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