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09 Aug 2020

Colonial coins of America. Part 1.

Coins-United States Colonial | coins are history

The year is 1607. King James has finally made a colony in the New World in what is now Jamestown, Virginia. This would later become the colony of Virginia. Though new colonies are established after this including the Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts Bay Colony, Rhode Island Colony and the Connecticut colony there is no coinage yet made in the New World. The execution of King Charles in 1649 led to the short lived republic in England. With this going on, the English did not send their colonies needed coinage such as French Ecus, Dutch "Lion Dollars," English Crowns and Spanish Pieces of Eight. In 1652, the colonists solved this problem when the Massachusetts Bay Colony opened a mint in Boston. The first type of coins they minted were what numismatists know today as "NE Style" pieces. These issues were struck in three pence, six pence and shilling or 12 pence. Today these pieces are extremely scarce being that the three pence is unique, there are eight known six pence examples, and the shillings are hard to come by. Due to the simplicity of this design with simply the letters NE and on the reverse- the Roman numerals III for 3, VI for 6, or XII for 12- these coins were very easy to counterfeit. So from 1653 to 1660 they switched to the harder to counterfeit "Willow Tree" coins. All of these coins however are both the same denomination and interestingly enough bear the same dates as the "NE Style" pieces. The obverse of these pieces show the "Willow Tree" and the words "In Masathusets." On the obverse there is the date of 1652, the denomination in pence of the coin and the words "New England." (On six pence and shilling pieces there is ano and andom which both translate to year.) Some people say that these pieces are rarer than the "NE Style" pieces which makes sense given that the "Willow Tree" shilling is more valuable than the "NE Style" shilling. As for the three pence and six pence there are 3 known and 14 known respectively. In 1660 the mint switched over to the "Oak Tree" pieces. Here we add on the two pence pieces as well as the three pence, six pence and shilling pieces we have already discussed. The major difference in this series is a switch in "trees" The two pence coin is the only coin in this series which does not have 1652 as a date instead it has 1662. Also, the two pence coin has two major varieties, the "2" in 1662 is small on some coins yet large on others. The three pence coin has two major varieties as well being the "in" on obverse and no "in" on the reverse. On the six pence coin there are also two varieties one with the word "in" on the obverse and the other with it on the reverse. For the shilling there are four major varieties the word "in" on both the left side and the bottom of the reverse, as well as the word "andom" with no "m" at the end. There is also one variety in which the tree is much more straight up and it almost looks like it is thorny. This is called the "Spiny Tree." "Oak Tree" coins are much less expensive than "NE Style" and "Willow Tree" coins but still fairly expensive. The "Oak Tree" pieces were replaced in 1667 by the "Pine Tree" pieces. For this design they dropped the two pence piece. The three pence, six pence, and the shilling have the same two varieties- the no pellets at trunk and pellets at trunk. This variety is recognized by looking at the stump of the tree and seeing if there are defined lines coming out from under it. There are three more varieties for the shilling. These are the no "h" in "Masathusets", the reversed "n" in "England" and the small planchet variety which is 1 to 9 millimeters smaller in diameter in relation to the regular large planchet. These of the four of the Massachusetts silver types that I have discussed are the most common. Next time, I will talk about coins issued for Maryland.

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31 May 2020

The first american coin

Coins-United States Colonial | Conordon

There have been many coins made in the united states. I am going to tell you about some of the first coins made in the united states.The first coin I am going to write about is the 1776 continental dollar. These coins are very rare and the silver version of the coin is even rarer. The continental dollar had 13 rings to represent the 13 colonies and were not used very commonly as money.The first official coin was made in 1783. It was made out of silver and had an eye surrounded by 13 stars. The coin was not used as commonly as other coins that were made before the revolutionary war but were used more commonly than the 1776 Continental dollar.I 1792 the government decided upon what the money system was going to be. That year they chose to include dollars, cents, and they also included gold coins. in 1792 the first copper coin was made. It was the large cent. not many people liked it because it was heavy and hard to use. In 1793 they created the first half cent which was discontinued later.In 1792 they also created the half Disme which was one of the first widely used coins.Those were some of the first coins minted in the us. I hope you enjoyed. If you have any questions you can ask me.

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23 Oct 2019

The Continental Dollar

Coins-United States Colonial | user_1727

Numismatics and history are very closely connected. From the earliest coinage to modern commemoratives, coins tell the story of triumph, conquest and tragedy throughout history. They tell the story of kings and of revolutions, exploration and innovation. This series looks at the history of the Modern World through the lense of 20 coins.

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23 Apr 2019

US Connecticut Copper 1787

Coins-United States Colonial | RPSeitz

I recently purchased this colonial coin. It has the inscription AUCTORI CONNEC (Authority Connecticut) and INDE ET LIB (Independence and Liberty), these old coppers are quite rare and highly sought by collectors. There are many different varieties, but only a very few well preserved specimens. My coin is heavily worn and somewhat discolored. This coin is about the lowest collectible grade and is only worth about $30 dollars, but I love it and the history that it represents. Better preserved specimens are worth quite a bit more. Very, very approximately:

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07 Oct 2017

New Jersey Copper

Coins-United States Colonial | World_Coin_Nut

The 3 gentlemen chosen by New Jersey had questionable pasts and abilities. New Jersey was one of the last of the original colonies to produce there own coinage. Of course some didn't coin any at all. It seems like with some of the choices that they made that there was a feeling of urgency when the endeavor was started.

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09 Apr 2017

Century old coin design

Coins-United States Colonial | Conan Barbarian

The now us government emblem has been a coin design since the 1790s. it first appeared on the copper cent in 1791 (W-10630) but once the us made the mint in Philadelphia the design was used for the dime, quarter, half dollar, and silver dollar. It has never appeared on the cent since the original design on the 1791 Washington cent but it has made rounds in1800-1805 on the Heraldic Eagle half dime1798-1807 Heraldic Eagle dime1804-1807Heraldic Eagle quarter 1892-1916 barber quarter1801-1807Heraldic Eagle half dollar1892-1916 barber half dollar1798-1804Heraldic Eagle silver dollar1796-1807Heraldicquarter eagle1795-1807Heraldichalf eagle1797-1804Heraldic eagle(the 1849-1866 double eagle is a knockoff and more intricatedesign of theHeraldic)also later the eagle was placed in a different position than the one on theHeraldic designs on the capped bust coins. on these the eagle was perchedon the arrows and branchesit was holding in theHeraldic design and it looked as if about to take flight.know 1964-present day the Kennedy half dollar contains the same design, modified a bit from the original but still relaying the same image.the designer of the original 1791 cent,John Gregory Hancock,never knew that his design would have such a large impact on america even a couple of centuries after his deathwe are still using it.

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07 Apr 2017

Century old design

Coins-United States Colonial | Conan Barbarian

The now us government emblem has been a coin design since the 1790s. it first appeared on the copper cent in 1791 (W-10630) but once the us made the mint in Philadelphia the design was used for the dime, quarter, half dollar, and silver dollar. It has never appeared on the cent since the original design on the 1791 Washington cent but it has made rounds in

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09 May 2016

French 1767 sou

Coins-United States Colonial | user_94464

There is one 1767 French souwith remarked RF at a local coin, store its price is $86. It is in VF-XF condition, and I don't think it has been cleaned. Do you think I should buy it? Is the price good? Is there a market for this coin?

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