Login

05 Nov 2022

Often Overlooked

Medals | Long Beard

United States Bicentennial commemorative medals, both official and privately struck, were a resounding success at the time of their inception. Some appearing in the years leading up to the Bicentennial of 1976. Literally hundreds, if not reaching the thousands, of these once treasured mementos of the time eventually finding their way into a cigar or shoe box tucked away in a closet or attic to be forgotten. To be certain there is still a select group, all be they much smaller in number than back in the 1970's, who collect and prize these true works of art. The author being one such, presents a particular piece just added to the hoard and subject for this week's blog. Enjoy!

READ MORE
18 Oct 2022

How I Learned To Make A Medal

Medals | Mike

Hi everyone !! Hope all is well!! Let me tell you the basics of how this came to be.. I am a member of the Ancient Order Of HIBERNIANS. Who are they? Well we were formed when Britain was killing the Irish People back centuries ago. When the price of a Priest head was the same as an Irish Wolf Hound.

READ MORE
29 Jan 2022

Working On a Mystery Without Any Clues: Eisenhower Medals?

Medals | I. R. Bama

So I'm doing my night moves on these two tokens that I recently got from my Mother. I get tons of Kennedy Halfs and other interesting coins and tokens from her because she is elderly, and everybody wants to dun her for money. But my Mom is sharp and I don't worry about her getting taken.

READ MORE
28 Jan 2022

WESTMINSTER ABBEY

Medals | Mike

Hi everyone. Well the snow is coming so I decided to write a blog on an item that I have not seen in a long time on this site. Medals The medal below I last wrote about four years ago. Only three people are still here. The contents will be different. The medal was made by a very famous medal maker . Jacques Weiner. He was the oldest of three brothers all excellent engravers. Now this was made in 1856. He had made thirty before this. He decided to do a series on fifty cathedrals in Europe. Things were going well. But when he came to the 41 medal he had lost his sight from all the detail he put into his work. I saw this on a Heritage Auction. No one was bidding. Then again most people don't collect medals and there were plenty to choose from. I saw the price and said I'm not winning this. I put a bid in and won!! Now he liked to write history on his medals. The bottom reads St. Peters church Founded about 612 rebuilt and erected an Abbey 958-1049. Now the left reads The present church constructed 1220-1285 restored end of the XV11 centurty. Now the right side reads Westminster Hall built 1397and the chapel of Henry V11 commenced 1503. Now that saved me allot of reserch. The name Hoydonk was the name of the person who researched Wieners medals. His full name was Emil Van Hoydonk.Now Jacques Weiner lived in Belgium. Born in 1815 died 1899. Now his two brothers did very well. His brother Charles became the assistant engraver at the Royal mint. His brother Leopold was appointed first engraver to the Belgium mint. A very talented family. There work commands good prices.

READ MORE
30 Aug 2021

ex Erlanger Nürnberg Medal

Medals | World_Coin_Nut

No matter what you collect there comes a time when you see something and know, “I have to get that.” That is the case with this medal. I specialize in pre-1871 German States coinage, further specializing in “Wildman” coins. Like a lot of us, I don’t do a good job of staying in my lane and end up buying other items that catch my eye. I didn’t swerve too far outside of my lane with this one. It is a 16th-century German medal from Nürnberg.Photo#1This is a by German Medalist, Valentin Maler (about 1540 – 1603), Mint-master in Nürnberg. The title typically given to it is, On Happiness in Marriage and the New Year. Kind of a clunky title but descriptive nonetheless. Below is the medal and a brief description.GERMAN COINS AND MEDALS NUREMBERG. CITY. Silver medal 1591by V. Maler, on happiness in marriage and the New Year.Obverse: An old man sits on an armchair with a child in his right arm and a Bible in his left, r. next to it stands a naked boy with a palm branch; In the background stands a female figure holding a crown over the old man, in her left hand a flaming gobletObverse Inscription: BEATUS VIR QVI TIME T DNVM ETAMBVLAT IN VIIS EIVS PSA:128Translation: HAPPY MAN WHO TIMET unexpectedly that follow the path he PSALMS: 128Reverse: 17 lines of writing.Diameter: 45.77 mmWeight: 40.47 g.Reverse Inscripton: ein uleissig weibesteine kro neiresmannes xxxi wem ein tugentsam weib bescheret ist die ist vieledler denn die kostlichsten perlen. ilsus sirach xxvi ein schon weib das from bleibt ist wie die helle lampen auf demh leuch. zu erhn allen fromen ehe levten und zu einenglv ck seligen newen iar durch ual maler . anno 1591My translation: A virtuous woman is her husband’s crown.When one finds a worthy wife, her value is far beyond pearls. Jesus./ Jesus Christ xxvi / A beautiful woman who remains pious is like a bright lamp / In honor of all pious marriages, and to a blissful New Year/ by V Maler. Year 1591As you can see from the description this particular medal is listed in 2 significant catalogs of German medals. The second one (Erlanger II, 2582) is the one that caught my attention.From the ANS (numismatics.org): Numismatist Herbert J. Erlanger (1906-1988) was born in Nuremberg, Germany, and became an expert in the coins of that city, publishing articles on the topic in The Numismatist and other publications, and in the books Die Reichsmünzstätte in Nürnberg and Nürnberger Medaillen. Erlanger was trained as an attorney at the University of Munich, and went on to represent motion picture companies such as Warner Brothers on the world market. He became an associate member of the American Numismatic Society in 1940 and a fellow in 1941. Stationed in Germany during World War II as a lieutenant in the United States Army, he acted as a liaison between the Society and German numismatists such as Max Bernhart, director of the numismatic cabinet of the Bavarian Academy of Science and recipient of the Huntington Medal (1946).The catalog of Erlanger’s collection is one of the standard references for the medals of Nürnberg. In this publication, the number 2582 is assigned to it and this is the plate piece from the catalog. Having meaningful provenance is always exciting for me.Photo#2I was surprised to see that since 2015 this piece has appeared in 4 auctions. When you count my purchase, it has changed hands at least 5 times in 6 years. I don’t know about everyone else, but I like to keep nice things for a while.Fromacsearch.info9/28/2015 Kunker’s Auction 266, Lot 13416/22/2016 Kunker’s Auction 278, Lot 199211/13/2018 Heidelberger Münzhandlung Auction 75, Lot 17678/10/2019 Kunker’s Auction 327, Lot 3510 sold to Shanna SchmidtIn addition to this one acsearch only shows 3 other examples being sold at Auction.Valentin Maler was a celebrated Medallist of Nuremberg, son-in-law of Wenzel Jamnitzer, the famous Nuremberg goldsmith, and father of Christian Maler. The date of his activity ranges from 1568 to 1603, in which year he probably died. The artist's origin has been traced to Iglau in Moravia, and it has further shown that before settling at Nuremberg he had been employed as Mint-engraver at Joachimsthal. He married Wenzel Jamnitzer's daughter Maria in 1569, and by special favor of the Nuremberg Town Council obtained the privileges of a Mastership. It is highly probable that Valentin Maler settled at Nuremberg in or sometime before 1568. A few years later we find him taking up his residence at the Saxon Court, which might account for the fact that of 1573 only one medal is known by the artist and of 1574 and 1575 none at all. He may also have worked in Silesia. After his return to Nuremberg, he remained in connection with the Prince-Elector of Saxony, and in 1590 executed a Portrait-medal of Christian I.It is further known, from contemporary documents, that the artist worked for the Bishop of Bamberg, but did not sign his productions at the episcopal court. Heller has recorded a payment of 22 florins made to Maler for the modeling of the Portrait-medal of Ernst von Mengersdorf, bishop of Bamberg.Besides his many cast medals, Maler is the creator of numerous struck pieces, most of which, were made for sale, but some also as Presentation-pieces for princes, as the oval badge of Charles II. of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen. These struck medals are by no means inferior in style to the cast pieces but are usually signed V.M. or still more frequently: V.M. CVM PRIVILE. CAES., and also FA. V.M.C. PRIVILE.The above was adapted from theBiographical dictionary of medallists; coin, gem, and seal-engravers, mint-masters, ancient and modern, with references to their works B.C. 500-A.D. 1900by Forrer.Valentin and his son Christian are both well-known medallists. I find most of their work rather bland. When compared to his other work I find it surprising that Valentin created such an intricate struck piece since most of his work is rather plain cast pieces.As with most coins and medals, there is a lot of symbolism on this piece. The old man would most like to represent the end of the year while the children are the birth of the new year. The flaming chalice is interesting. During these periods in history, a person shown holding a chalice signifies that they are God’s servant and have turned away from evil. Why it is flaming is something I am uncertain of. In Christianity, the palm branch is associated with Jesus' Triumphal Entry on Palm Sunday.I want to talk about the transaction with Shanna Schmidt. In my years as a collector, I have never dealt with a more professional dealer. Before making the purchase, I had multiple questions that she answered without hesitation. In addition, she provided documents like the catalog scans above. Below is the image that I fell in love with. In my opinion, it is far superior to the ones above from Kunker’s sales and the scan from the catalog. Typically, her inventory is far outside of my price range but I now understand why she is regarded so highly.Photo#3 from Shanna SchmidtAs a side note, I have also acquired a copy of the Erlanger auction catalog to accompany this medal. They typically sell for good money on their own but I found a seller on Abe Books that was selling one for the price of a new paperback novel.

READ MORE
26 May 2021

The Smallest Biggest Medal

Medals | Mike

Hi everyone. A couple of weeks ago I saw a medal of Abraham Lincoln. It was at an auction. I will describe the medal I saw. It was made of copper 7.28 gm and 35mm. It came in three sizes they had two. The weight by the way includes the ribbon . He is facing right. The obverse reads centennial of Abraham Lincoln MCMIX. Also the designers name is under his neck. B.L.Pratt in small letters above the year. Who by the way studied under Augusta St. Gaudins. And also made the U.S. Gold 5 Indian Head... Now that's just the beginning. The reverse has an eagle with outstretched wings with an Olive Branch in his talons. Then the famous words. He had many but they chose these. "The Government of The People By the People Shall Not Perish From the Earth" Under that there is a Fasces. A Fasces comes from the Latin word meaning bundle. Bundles of wooden slats sometimes with an axe and the blade being seen.. The medal itself is uncirirculaded and has a beautiful Patina on it. Now that's allot for a small medal. The Fasces goes back to the Romans you will see it in other coins. It is rapped most of the time in leather. Now it came in the original cardboard holder with plastic protecting it. This is from 1909. It has gold embossed lettering on the face. See picture bellow. In the reverse of the holder there is a typed message. It reads "Official Medal Issues by the State Of New York Under Authority of George W. McClellen Mayor of New York Febuary12,1909. (Medal Designed By Bella Lyon Pratt)." Now you didn't expect this beautiful medal to take so much time to describe. But big things come in small packages. This medal was taken care of. Yes the holder is beat up a little if look how old it is. It's actually in great shape for its age. It did it's job I just wish I had the name of the person who owned this. It was made at the Whitehead & Hoag company in New Jersey. The designer Pratt lived from 1 867 to May 18 1917. Now my feelings. Medals come in all sizes and shapes. Here we have a small medal that contains so much history. It truly is a piece of our country and history When I saw it I thought it was a cent with a ribbon. Then I read the description. I couldn't believe it. You have Lincoln and the words he

READ MORE
18 Apr 2021

They Asked Me To Make A Medal!

Medals | Mike

I hope everyone is well. Now i was going thru some coins and found this medal. I knew I had written a blog on this year's ago. I went back and read it. It was awful. So I decided to write the right way.! Years ago I belonged to the Ancient Order Of Hibernians. It is an ancient order formed in 1565 by Rory Oge O'Moore.. He organized it because the BrItish were cutting the heads of Catholic Priest which was the same price as the head of the Irish Wolfhound. They say a light left on at night meant it was a safe house for.a.Priest. Now our 175 anniversary in the United States was coming up. There thinking was it you collect coins you know how to make them!.So i was volunteered to make this medal. I had no idea were to start. I knew we needed an obverse and a reverse with meaning. So i contacted our Nation Historian. Mike McCormick.. He was the best. I contacted Tom McSorley to help me with phone calls.. I called the Highland mint since I did business with them before. They were very helpful. I thought they would ask for a sculpture . You don't know what they need.Mike did his research and came up with many designs. We would disagree on this one and that one. Then he found the obverse. The American Flag and The Irish Flag from centuries before. We agreed. He added the Celtic cross above the shaking hands. Our motto Friendship ,Unity ,Christian Charity. The ribbon A.O.H. The date May 4, 1836. Now I sent it to the mint. Here was the learning part. He taught me about making the dies. How deep did we want it ? What type metal. I knew some of the process. So I just said yes. The reverse was easy . We were formed in Philadelphia and New York the same day!.So the Liberty Bell and the Statue of Liberty. Heritage and Homeland. 175 for the years. Born in Liberty in English and Gaelic.. The dates on the bottom. This did not take a week. It took months. We disagreed and agreed.The phone calls to the mint . What size do we send. Color or black and white. I asked the mint if I could have four medal made in silver proof. No problem no charge and numbered. The label says 2011 Medal.Ancient Order Of Hibernians #0002. 1OZ .999 silver PF 68 DCAM. This sounded easy but just can tell you this took six or seven months. I learned so much . From beginning to end. We ordered bronze.10,000. Now it cost if I remember 3.50 each. Or 4.00. We charged 25.00. Don't forget at this point we still defend the clergy. .But we raised funds for.charity.Any charity . . We write the checks. Everyone benifits. We never have said no to a legitimate charity. We're very proud of that. So that's an idea of some of the things . How many ? How much? Mailing, cost of shipping records. And the medal.. It's just not drawing a circle. You need a very sharp design. It couldn't be hand drawn. Putting it all together on a computer. So I saw it through. The affects of my accident had got to bad. My decades of service had to end. They did make me a life member. I had done many things for the Order. This was one of the highlights. Thanks hope you enjoyed it!So to Michael McComick who did the most. The research. He did us well with his knowledge. Without it we would still be working on it.!

READ MORE

Money.org Blog and Forum Terms & Conditions of Use / Disclaimer

This is a community-sourced blog. Any views or opinions represented in this blog are personal and belong solely to the blog post’s author, and do not represent the views or opinions of the American Numismatic Association, and may not represent the views or opinions of people, institutions or organizations that the author may or may not be associated with in professional or personal capacity.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The American Numismatic Association (ANA) makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The ANA does not monitor the blog on a constant basis.

The ANA will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information, nor for the availability of this information. The ANA will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.

Downloadable Files and Images

Any downloadable file, including but not limited to pdfs, docs, jpegs, pngs, is provided at the user’s own risk. The ANA will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages resulting from a corrupted or damaged file.

Blog/Forum Posts and Comments

In these terms and conditions, “user content” means material including without limitation text, images, audio material, video material, and audio-visual material that you submit to this website, for whatever purpose.

Blog/forum posts and comments are encouraged. However, the ANA reserves the right to edit or delete any blog/forum posts or comments without notice. User content deemed to fall under the following categories will be removed and may prompt disciplinary actions, including, but not limited to, review and suspension/revocation of blog and forum privileges:

  • User content deemed to be spam or questionable spam.
  • User content intended for commercial purposes or to buy, sell or trade items.
  • User content containing profanity.
  • User content containing language or concepts that could be deemed offensive.
  • User content containing hate speech, credible threats, or direct attacks on an individual or group.

In addition, user content shall not be illegal or unlawful, shall not infringe any third party’s legal rights, and shall not be capable of giving rise to legal action whether against you, the ANA, or a third party under any applicable law.

The ANA may terminate your access to all or any part of the website at any time, with or without cause, with or without notice, effective immediately. If you wish to terminate this Agreement or your Money.org account (if you have one), you may simply discontinue using the website. All provisions of this Agreement which by their nature should survive termination shall survive termination, including, without limitation, ownership provisions, warranty disclaimers, indemnity and limitations of liability.

The ANA reserves the right to display advertisements on your account and blog pages.

This blog’s terms & conditions of use / disclaimer is subject to change at anytime.

We use cookies to provide users the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you agree to receive all cookies on money.org. You may disable cookies at any time using your internet browser configuration. By continuing to use this website, you agree to our privacy policy and terms of use. To learn more about how we use cookies and to review our privacy policy, click here.