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23 Sep 2020

S.S. ANDREA DORIA - GENUINE $1 1935E Silver Certificate "A" Grade

Paper Money-U.S. | Curtis Lynn Stainbrook

On July 26, 1956, the pride of the Italian fleet, was struck by the Swedish ocean liner, Stockholm in a pea-soup fog off the coast of Nantucket. Forty-six people perished in this tragic event. Mr. Peter Gimbel was one of the first to dive and photograph the ship after she had sunk. In 1981, Peter Gimbel and his wife and partner, Elga Anderson launched The Doria Project. One of its goals was to retrieve the first class safe, operated by Credito Italiano, one of Italy's largest banks. On August 25, 1985, the safe was finally recovered. When the safe was opened and the opaque black water drained off, it yielded a treasure of currency.

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03 Jul 2020

Master of the Grand Illusion

Paper Money-U.S. | Long Beard

As we as nation approach the 244th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence I thought of a subject which seemed appropriate and connected to the words written on those cherished sheets of paper. As I looked at thefifty-six names on the bottom for inspiration, several names suddenly became linked to the creation of our financial system. Three of whichrepresented on our coinage, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington on the two current coins and BenjaminFranklin on the former half dollar. In an instant the latter became the subject of research for this weeks topic and wow, what a fascinating brilliantindividual Franklin was. One would think, as I had, that it be about the half dollar or his connection to the Continental Dollar, it is not. Enjoy!

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26 Apr 2020

Hawaii Love Note

Paper Money-U.S. | Mr_Norris_LKNS

Thought I'd share my latest find. As many know, one of my favorite topics in numismatics involves items related to the Second World War, particularly money that would have been in circulation during the war, from any country. Some of the most popular wartime numismatic items would be the emergency paper currency issues, particularly the gold seal "North Africa" notes and the reddish-brown seal "Hawaii" notes. I put these descriptions in quotation marks because, although that is how they are commonly known, and indeed were used in those respective locations, these notes saw use in wider ranges than those specific geographic areas.The attached photos are of a 1935-A US One Dollar silver certificate of the Hawaii overprint emergency currency variety, serial number S49597732C. In the blank spaces on either side of President Washington's portrait, someone has inscribed "A Kiss for you Hon - X" and "Loving you always. X" ("X" being a shorthand symbol for a kiss in a love letter; and "hon" being short form for "honey", a common term of endearment). In the blank spaces above and below the Hawaii overprint on the back, the inscription reads "I love you, Hon." and "You are my Sweets".After the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941, the US Government was worried that an invasion of Hawaii might be imminent. Being a populous US territory, Hawaii required a significant quantity of US currency for its local economy to function. In addition to the destruction and hardships a Japanese conquest would bring to the locals, another credible concern was that the currency that could be captured by the Japanese could be used against American interests. It was decided to swap out the regular US currency being used there (and in additional territories around the Pacific) for a special issue that could be demonetized (i.e., declared worthless) by our government should a significant amount be captured. These special emergency notes were overprinted with the word "HAWAII" on both the face and the back (see photos) and used a reddish-brown Treasury seal on the face as opposed to the blue seal on regular issue notes. This "brown" seal had been used on other notes, but it was distinctive enough with the "Hawaii" overprint that it made them easily distinguishable among circulating currency. These notes were meant for circulation in designated Pacific theater areas, and not for the mainland US. Conversely, "mainland" currency was recalled in these locations and exchanged for "Hawaii" notes; anyone retaining "mainland" currency in these areas could be considered to be in violation of Federal law. Fortunately, the invasion of Hawaii by Japanese armed forces never materialized, and the devaluation of these notes was never necessary. The issuance of Hawaii notes was discontinued, and regular issues were resumed.The Pearl Harbor attack generated a massive patriotic response among the American people, with many individuals signing up for military service or defense work specifically to avenge their country against Japan. Hundreds of thousands of individuals who may never otherwise have visited Hawaii or other far-flung Pacific territories did so through the performance of their wartime duties. The long distances and fear of the uncertainties of war caused many a young heart to long for some other young heart, with the promise of love's affection upon their return to keep them going. Souvenirs would be collected along their journeys and often sent home to their loved ones. As these travelers went about their daily lives, they encountered strange new currencies. These notes too would end up being sent home as souvenirs, often with a message scrawled across them or in the margins, whether an annotation of how or where it was acquired, or perhaps a more personal note.Perhaps most numismatists with even a passing interest in World War Two are familiar with "short snorter" notes, which took either the form of a single note with a collection of signatures of people met by the bearer, or a string of notes cellophane-taped together in sequence as acquired during the bearer's travels. Also fairly commonly known, although far more widespread in history than World War Two, are "love tokens", or coins which have been defaced and engraved with a name, image, or romantic message as a tangible memento of affection between the giver and its recipient. The Love Token Society defines two requirements: that it be made from a legitimate coin, and that it be engraved by hand [as opposed to commercially produced]. My newly-acquired Hawaii note falls somewhere in between. It is not made from a coin, so by a strict Love Token Society definition it is not a love token; but like a coin, it indeed was originally created as a form of government-issued currency to be used for facilitating commerce, and subsequently modified by a private individual to convey a message of affection to another. Yet it doesn't quite arise to the level of a short snorter, because whoever wrote on it chose not to include the name of either the giver or the recipient. Maybe names were assumed unnecessary, as the sender and recipient were understood to be the same as the sender and recipient of a letter in which the note was included. Or perhaps one or both parties had reasons to keep the nature of their relationship under wraps at the time. Or perhaps at the time it was inscribed the writer wasn't sure of the recipient's proper name due to the whirlwind nature of their romance. Or perhaps the inscriber hadn't narrowed down the choice of recipient to a specific individual!So instead of a love token or a short snorter, I have a love note written on a Hawaii emergency note. Is this a new category of Second World War numismatics? Or just a defaced Hawaii note? It's possible it was inscribed after the war, but due to it being in very nice, lightly circulated condition and fairly clean, I like to think that it was likely a wartime souvenir between two long-distance lovebirds, with the traveler reassuring the recipient that, despite traveling to far-flung exotic and possibly romantic locations, love and affection between them would remain faithful and true... making this the paper currency version of a love token.

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20 Apr 2020

CHIEF HOLLOW HORN BEAR

Paper Money-U.S. | Longstrider

A few people here have been asking what we collect. Here is an example of something other than Peace Dollar VAMs that I collect when I see a nice one. This is my newest example of a Military Payment Certificate or MPC. This is, in my opinion, one of the most outstanding MPC we made. In fact the entire Series 692 has been described as the "Most American" of all the different series of MPC's.

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29 Aug 2019

Star Note Lookup Info

Paper Money-U.S. | user_17552

I have decided to research. I have learned a lot since looking into star serial number paper currency. I have always loved star bills, as some call them, but now I understand better how their value works. Star serial numbers are created when a bill of a certain serial number has to be destroyed because it had an error. Since the government doesn't allow the same number to be used twice, a star is added instead of the letter that was once there.

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28 Aug 2019

Paper Currency Question

Paper Money-U.S. | user_17552

I can't upload a picture but I will give description. I have a $5 bill 2013. The serial number is MF00009792* So my question is, is this bill worth keeping and of an increased value as a result of its serial number?

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23 Jul 2019

CRAZY gains

Paper Money-U.S. | A.J.

just a few hours a go, i got some AMAZING thing from my grandma! i got:-my fourth 1963 benji half- 2 silver quarters, 1944 and 1964 D respectively-a lot of spendable half dollars and dollar coins, and a bicentennial quarter, 4.75 face-a crisp 1995 2 dollar bill-6 silver certificates, 5 1957 and 1 1935-and the creme of the crop, a great and rare note, a 1923 PORTHOLE 5 DOLLAR SILVER CERTIFICATE!Note: picture is not mine

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