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17 Sep 2022

2019 Houston Space Center Token

Tokens | AC coin$

**As for the token, there is not much information available or disclosed regarding quantities produced, nor material(s) used when manufacturing or minting it. Its approximatediameter is around 27-29 mm and about 6.3 grs of weight. Its border or circumference is reeded. Thank you for your visits and comments in this and all my blogs.

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10 Sep 2022

1910 Puerto Rico Farmer's Workhand Token

Tokens | AC coin$

When the United States of America administration took over the island of Puerto Rico, around September 1898, it faced an unstable economy and precarious infrastructure, both inland and at the larger cities. Within the first 22 to 32 years of American presence in the once held Spanish stronghold, this type of token or menchant's coin circulated in various shapes, sizes and even non-round forms. Its dimensions fluctuated from 19mm to 25mm at most, and usually made of tin or rarely in aluminum, not many were struck in copper. Even though the one shown here is from 1910, this specific type was circulating from as early as 1900, mostly struck in the back of a warehouse at a larger city in the island with subsidiaries for each merchant or farm dealer.Inland, specifically within the mountain towns, agriculture and the selling of necessary goods was practically the two aspects moving people in and out of farm sustained communities. Those who stayed, faced dependency on major "Hacienda" owners as laborers and non-payed workhands. Being on a non-pay status meant to depend on running food certified bills or food notes and, within more organized farms, tokens with various denominations pegged to larger commercial providers or wholesale dealers (who at most instances were well-to-do Spaniards who befriended American investors and government officials.)This is a 1910 token worth 10 cents, pegged to F. GÓMEZ a merchandiser tied to the "Hacienda Palma Escrita" in themunicipality of Las Marías, Puerto Rico. The town is located in the Western Central Mountain range. This area is known to produce Valenciana type oranges, coffee and other citric fruits. With this token, a laborers' wife was able to acquire flour, sugar, dry goods and in rare cases meat. Prizes were that low, poverty was extremelly high. This products were also bought at the merchandiser's store facility usually or conveniently located within the entrance of the Hacienda or plantation. It was a round business.This is historically relevant as a monetary item representation, a token with buying power from the very beginning of the twentieth century. It is a vintage non-financial item from a territory of the USA as it worked towards a better future.

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15 Apr 2022

Broadening of the Horizon

Tokens | Long Beard

In my quest to complete the circulating coinage of my ancestors, those from Ireland, the fascinating sub-type of coin collecting Condor Tokens drew me in when finding and buying the beauty in the images. The Cronebane-Wicklow, the subject of the week. Enjoy!

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30 Mar 2022

The St. Patrick Half Penny 1670

Tokens | Mike

Saint Patrick . The half penny. This is the first blog I'm writing about a coin I do not own yet!On the obverse it is written Florest Rex . This means may the King flourish. The reverse its written Quiteslay Plebs. That means may the people be at peace.it shows David playing the harp gazing at the Royal Crown of England wish was a gold color.

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27 Mar 2022

Schenectady, New York tokens

Tokens | RyanK96

Is anyone aware of a reference book or catalog that lists all of the tokens made relating to the Schenectady/Albany, New York area?

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05 Feb 2022

Gates of Coventry

Tokens | Mike

Hi!Hope everyone is doing well. Today I will write about about the Gates Of Coventry. Now I will not write the whole article that was published in the Clarion magazine published at the last P.A.N. show. I had no idea that I was published. A good friend suggested it and the editor and publisher said yes.. When I received the magazine in the mail I had no idea the cover was about my article!The beauty of the set they all grade between MS 63 to 66. Not bad for 223 years old!! Please look at the engraving of these. It must of taken months to make a die. You can see every brick and window. This was a man born with the talent.

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17 Dec 2021

Chicago Transit Authority Token Varieties

Tokens | Mr_Norris_LKNS

UPDATE: The Smithsonian Institute has one of these tokens in their collection as part of their National Museum of American History. According to their website, these tokens were made in the early 20th century by the Scovill Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connectictut. Scovill made, among other things, buttons, tokens, coins, and medals... and staplers, as my mother had a Scovill stapler at her desk for many years.

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23 Aug 2021

St.Michael's Church D&H 38a Coventry Penny

Tokens | Mike

Well I could write pages on this church and the token. But I will keep it short. It is one of the most sought after tokens in the Conder series. It speaks for it's self. It's absolutely beautiful . It was built in the 14th &15th century. I could not find an architect associated with this wonderful church.The token is 28.3 grams and 36.0 mm. It's big and heavy. I will say it now. It is very under graded. Only NGC knows. This token was made for collectors. And for buying goods. It is a Penny! What I found is back in the 11th century a stone was put on the site and a church was built there called St. Mary's Priory.That church grew in stature and in status with funding from the medieval guilds. Chapels we're incorporated into the main fabric of the church. Soon St. Michael's had11 alters and seven chapels. The Chancel is a space around the alter. Sometimes it included the choir and sanctuary. This token was done by a great die sinker. Thomas Wyon. He made many wonderful pieces. As a matter of fact Wyon and Kempson teamed up on many projects. I can't imagine how long it took to make the die for this token. Just the detail . His son's also were die sinker. Even though this is a Coventry token it was left out of the set because it's a penny. The set is all half penny's. Wyon etched his name on the obverse and reverse you can only see It with a loop. It was built in the gothic style. It's spire was the tallest of all. Close to 300 feet. After a while it was the third tallest. This wonderful church soon became a Cathedral in 1918 it would still be standing. But Hitler kept on bombing the churches. St. Michael's was destroyed in the blitz on November 14,1940. They destroyed 600 buildings and killed 500 people. The picture below with Churchill the Bishop of Coventry and the Mayor was taken not to long after the blitz. They said he had a tear in his eye. ....A architect by the name of Basil Urwin Spence. Was asked to rebuild St. Michaels. He decided to build it right next to the ruins. The ruins will never come down. They want it to remind them of the destruction of war. This was in 1956 to 1962. ..Now like I said there is so much on this beautiful church I could write more. But please enlarge the pictures. This token took years to find. It's a rarity one. The D&H 38 Coventry is a triple rairty. It has edge writing saying Coventry token.They did not make many of each one. I have been looking on and of for years. Now it's home were it belongs. Hope you enjoyed the readers digest verson. Thanks. Mike. P.S. THE STAINED GLASS THAT THEY FOUND THEY PRESERVED. IT WAS OF THE HIGHEST QUALITY OF THE TIME!!

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27 Jul 2021

More Conder Tokens

Tokens | Mike

Hi. Yes this will be a short blog on some of the buildings on Kempson tokens. The ones I chose today are a few of the buildings still standing from the time they were built. Some are so good it looks like Kempson took a picture of them.. The best part is the years these buildings were put up. I'm not talking 1797. Some of these were built in the 1300's the 1500's. and so on. Just think of that for a moment. The English were excellent record keepers so the dates were not just put on these. You can say some went over rehabilitation but the original face of the structure is the same. Now Kempson almost seems like he knew these would still be around for hundreds of years even some of the gates that protected the city still stand. They are beautiful works architecture. The wall that encircled the city parts still stand. Doing research I said I wonder if some of these are still standinng. I went to work and i was surprised. St.John's church later became St.John's High School. I wrote a journal of these at N.G.C. A few days later I get a message from a fellow collector . He said I went to St John's school there I grew up in Coventry.. Small world. I asked him if he or if he knew of others that lived there if they had any of these tokens. He said none. Passed down from his family he was told they used them. Now I bet if I continued I will find more. This is something I thought of after the set was finished. The other tokens I collect many are still standing. Not just Kempson but others. Cathedrals ,government buildings. If you check Kempson other set of building of London many still stand. Some were destroyed in WW. 11. Hitler had an obsession with Coventry. He bombed it a lot. One famous Cathedral. St. Paul's he wanted destroyed. He felt it be could level this Cathedral it would take the resolve from the people and he could take England. He sent over 200 bombers and St.Paul's still stands. The people stayed inside and put out the fires. It was built if I remember by Wren. It's in the heart of London. One thing NGC graded many Red Brown the token below it looks like the lights are on!! St.Marys Sorry I got it the topic. That's ok the two are connected. St. John's token and picture like I said look so much alike. The same with Bablake and St. Mary's Hall. St. Mary's is used as a catering hall today and ceremonies. If you look at the token and the picture there is a wonderful likeness. . I will end this short blog on these wonder tokens and buildings. I hope.you see the talent of this man. We need people like this working today the old way. The way commens were done and older.coins. No lasers here.!!Be well be safe!!

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