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19 Aug 2018

ANA YN Auction Hall Of Fame Moments

Young Numismatists Exchange | The Coin Student

There were moments that I showed in last weeks article that were amazing, but what about giving some of them names? Names like the bid, the yep, the tweet (you read that right) and more are included in this ANA's YN Auction Hall Of Fame article. So enjoy.

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16 Aug 2018

Numismatic Book Review: The Red Book

Young Numismatists Exchange | The Coin Student

So we know how The Red Book by the famous numismatic author R.S. Yeoman is a great numismatic reference guide, to an extent. If you want a basic range of the value of coins, then this is a really great tool. But if you want the most recent values then you really need some other things in which I will get to soon. I say that this a great book is for beginners. The first Red Book I ever had was a 2012 Red Book. I loved that book, I learned stuff like how there were half dimes and 3 cent pieces and that there used to be a mint in Dahlonega, Georgia. Fun times. But now I realize that the Red Book is not the best tool to use when evaluating the value of coins for some reasons that I have below:

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16 Aug 2018

Numismatic Book Review: Coin Collecting for Dummies

Young Numismatists Exchange | The Coin Student

So we know the Red-Book is the #1 book you need to give a new collector, but what about another book? Reading up is always a good option, even though some may say its out of date. Here today I present to you the second book a new collector must read in order to be successful in the hobby. This book is written by Neil Berman, a professional rare coin dealer and Ron Guth, the president of PCGS. The book starts out with an important decision most coin collectors have made at the beginning of their numismatic journey. World, U.S., or Ancient coins? Those are the three main subdivisions of coin collecting. I personally chose U.S. coins, but that doesn't mean down the road I can dabble in some world coins. It is generally a good idea though at the beginning of one's numismatic journey to slim down their options to stay more focused. The book later shows how to make heads and tails of price guides (No Pun Intended), finding a good coin dealer, looking at gold coins when the time is right and finally selling coins yourself when you are a more experienced numismatist. I would not recommend this book to more advanced coin collectors unless you are getting it as a gift for a newer coin collector. So when you're going to pick up that 2019 Red Book for that new collector in your life, remember to pick up this book too.

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15 Aug 2018

Why YN Dollars Should Be Rewarded To YN's Who Make Videos

Young Numismatists Exchange | The Coin Student

So I was wondering what the guidelines for an educational numismatic video would be to earn YN dollars. I was thinking that the ANA's YN program could institute a minimal length requirement of a video to 5 or 10 minutes, depending on their preferences. Also, I thought they could review the quality of the videos on a case by case basis so that no low-quality videos are being put out there just to earn YN dollars. As for the amount of YN dollars earned for the educational numismatic videos, I would draw a comparison to the video being like a "numismatic talk to the world" accessible on Money.org and YouTube. That would lead me to suggest a 50 YN dollar amount for each video for reasons below. I have seen some other YN's coin YouTube channels and the numbers were great. Some had hundreds of views and subscribers, but one in particular had over a thousand and on one video had over 14 thousand views! That would be a lot of exposure to the ANA and Money.org as well. Compare hundreds to even thousands of people watching these educational numismatic videos to the small number of active people on the Money.org blog. With that said the ANA should require a ANA promo at the beginning of each video so that you guys are getting that media exposure I'm talking about to hundreds and even thousands of people each video. With extra media exposure from these videos, the 50 YN dollar incentive should be enough to get YN's working hard to make educational, quality, numismatic-related videos for the numismatic community to enjoy.

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14 Aug 2018

YN Auction Best Moments-A memory of the fun (and not so fun) moments

Young Numismatists Exchange | The Coin Student

The auction has been around for 3 years, coming up four this September. It's time to remember the best moments in the ANA's annual YN auction.

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01 Aug 2018

How I got into collecting...

Young Numismatists Exchange | Cartercoin13

How I got into collecting is a different story than most you have probably heard. I went on an overnighter for scouts and my friends did the coin collecting merit badge. When we were walking back to camp they started talking to me about it and how they were going to start a coin club. I took some interest, mainly because of how they told me pennies could be worth thousands. A few days after I went on a trip to Colorado and went into an antique shop. I didn't know much about collection but I saw the shop had many coins. I asked if they had indian head pennies, and wheat pennies (which were really the only valuable coins I knew about then), he went into the back of his shop and came back with some interesting things. I only bought two indian heads for a buck each, which is a pretty good deal, and a wheat penny for a dollar, (which I regret). If I would've known more about error coins there is this one penny that I wish I would've coughed up the money for. He had an indian head penny that had been struck twice on the back, but heres the thing, the second strike on the reverse was the back of a mercury dime. He only asked 25 dollars for it so I guess he didn't know much about error coins either.

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28 Jul 2018

Who was Hermon Atkins MacNeil?

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_86205

Out in a farm in Everett, Massachusetts, Hermon Atkins MacNeil was born on February 27th, 1866. He began art classes at a school in a large city of Boston, Massachusetts. Hermon would later graduate form the school and attend a university. While at Cornell University, he continued to learn and grow in multiple areas of art as a young adult. After this, Hermon moved to Europe to master sculpting, modeling, and other forms of art. He settled in France for a couple of years and attended well known schools to increase his mastery in the skill. Hermon returned to America to work with Frederick MacMonnies and Lorado Taft. He took the role of teaching at the Art Institute of Chicago and eventually started his own art studio. A typical work of art by Hermon produced Native Americans. Over time his respect for natives increased. He even traveled to tribes to recreate artwork and pictures for them. At the young age of twenty-nine, Hermon married Carol Louise Brooks who was also a sculptor. Their wedding took place on Christmas Day, 1885. The following year, Hermon received a scholarship allowing the newly wed couple to move to Rome. There they had a son and Hermon started another art studio. After completing pieces of art, they traveled again back to Paris, France. As he traveled around, his reputation increased as he made more and more art. From there he settled back in United States of America. Here Hermon created many works of art to be displayed at various expositions. The United States mint directory which was Robert Woolley at the time, was pushing for new coin designs. Hermon entered the contest for the new quarter design. A famous man named Adolph Weinman at the same time entered his designed. Adolph's were chosen for the United States dime and half dollar. Hermon's design was liberty holding a shield and an olive branch. This is today called the Standing Liberty Quarter. His intent with the design was to symbolize that the United States wanted peace during World War I. Also, the shield represented that they would fight if needed. He wasn't happy about all of the changes wanted by Director Friedrich von Engelken. Hermon placed changes he wanted on the Standing Liberty Quarter, resulting in a type II. Hermon's inspiration was based off of Doris Doscher for his Standing Liberty. This design lasted for fourteen years, and ended at the start of the Great Depression, in 1930. This was to be his only United States coin, but his work didn't stop there. He completed work on the United States Supreme Court building, the Pony Express, and competed in several contests. He lived in his home and art studio till his death. He died at the age of 81. Hermon Atkins MacNeil completed many accomplishments in his life full of art and sculpting.

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28 Jul 2018

Who was James Barton Longacre?

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_86205

Little did he know that he would become a famous 19th century chief engraver and and the 4th one at the U.S. Mint. Sarah and Peter Longacre on August 11, 1794 has a son named James Barton Longacre. James and his family at the time lived out in the country on a farm in Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Growing up, Sarah Longacre, his mother, died while James was at a young age. When home life became difficult, James left to go on his own. He found work being an apprentice for a book seller named James Watson. Then finding his passion, James went out to work for George Murray, a banknote engraver. At around twenty five, he began his own engraving business. James engraved plates for bank notes, book illustrations, and the founding fathers. Many years later, on September 16th, 1844, the president at the time commissioned James to the role of being the 4th chief engraver of the U.S. Following the death of the 3rd chief engraver, Christian Gobrecht, Janes struggled getting along with fellow workers at his job. His fellow coworkers even went as far as trying to get him fired . The first two big projects he was in charge of were the Liberty Head Hold Dollar and a double eagle coin. As there would be many changes in the gold dollar coins, James Longacre would be the only designer and engraver. He would be a major overseer of the opening of the San Fransico mint. Inspired by the previous chief engraver, James created the Flying Eagle one cent. They then decided to change the design to an easier one to mint. He created a fantastic design for the next cent, the Indian Head penny. Slight changes were made along the way too. James must have liked the Indian Head Princess design, engraving the Indian Head penny similar. He would later go onto uniquely design the first United States two cent piece in 1864. It was ended in 1873. Even more interesting, he introduced the three cent piece. The composition would include silver from 1851 to 1873 and it would chang to nickel after. It would cease to exist in 1889. James was not done yet. He brought back the idea of the half dime, only calling his recreation the five cent "nickel." His first design would be the shield nickel and later types of nickels would follow. At his time spent being the chief engraver he encountered William Barber, father of Charles Barber, and other known people. James would also help in the production of Chile coins, too. Sadly, James Longacre would pass away during New Year's Day. He had his final breath on January 1st, 1869. Fellow workers that knew James came together to remember his death. William Barber would then follow James as the 5th United States chief engraver. His son, Charles would then take the role as the 6th chief engraver.

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