Login

CoinLady's Blog

16 Dec 2017

A beautiful model

Coins-United States | CoinLady

One of the most popular models for a US coin can be seen at the US Mint in Philadelphia. I made a special trip to see this model. Collectors are familiar with the coins to this day.
Peter the eagle was a bald eagle who was a regular visitor to the Mint in Philadelphia. His lovely form can be seen on many US coins, most notably the Gobrecht dollar and the Flying Eagle cent. The bird was an unofficial mascot of the Mint. It's unknown what attracted this bird to the Mint. Maybe it was all the activity, all the people.
The eagle died after one of his wings was caught in machinery. The bird was preserved and is mounted, still visible at the Philadelphia Mint. I made a point of viewing this beautiful bird when I toured the Mint some years ago. He was also the subject of an article I wrote,  "A salute to Peter the eagle."

Comments

Its nice the mint gave Peter his due and preserved him for display under glass. Peter is in grand company with Vladimir Lenin and Chairman Mao.... only more loved.

Longstrider

Level 6

My wife's Grandpa had a wild dove that would sit on his head as he messed around in his little garages shop.Free to come and go. Sadly, after several years, he suffered a similar fate as Peter the Eagle. Grandpa never really got over the loss of "Coo-Coo"! Thanks

World_Coin_Nut

Level 5

That's a fine fact to learn. Like others have said, I can't imagine what he found interesting at the mint unless they were feeding him.

Kepi

Level 6

Wow...That's sad, what a horrible way to die. Poor Peter. I think they should get a new mascot.

"SUN"

Level 5

I can't imagine an eagle hanging around the mint.

Mike

Level 7

I hate to hear of any animal dying but Peter must of been special. I personally never heard of him but maybe they should get another mascot. Thanks for that I will look Peter up. Mike.

We use cookies to provide users the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you agree to receive all cookies on money.org. You may disable cookies at any time using your internet browser configuration. By continuing to use this website, you agree to our privacy policy and terms of use. To learn more about how we use cookies and to review our privacy policy, click here.