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22 Oct 2018

Most Difficult To Grade Coins

Coins | iccoins

Coin grading is one of the most important things a collector must learn before going very far into the hobby. Coin grading is not only valuable to find the condition of your coins but also to make sure you’re buying or selling coins at a fair price based on their condition. Professional coin grading services, such as PCGS, NGC, and ANACS, have trained professionals to determine the grade, and thus, the value of your rare coin(s). Some coins are easy to grade, while others are much moredifficult, for one reason or another. Often this involves the design of the coin, which may be unique to a specific series. This can also makedeterminingif a coin is genuine difficult. These are some of the most difficult coins to grade, even for professionals who have been in the profession for many years.

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12 Oct 2018

Numismatics Myths

Coins | iccoins

Throughout the world of numismatics, there are several myths that are believed by, often, far too many people. Most of these myths are not believed by coin collectors but are common for outsiders of the hobby to believe – and for good reason.

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02 Oct 2018

What Got Me Into Collecting? Part II

Coins | iccoins

Everyone has their own unique story about how he or she got interested in coins and here’s mine. If you haven’t seen Part 1 yet, be sure to check it out before reading this so you don’t miss anything!

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20 Sep 2018

"Gold" Quarters

Coins | iccoins

Companies attempt to sell “gold” quarters as great future coin investments, which they are not. Because the term “gold” generally coincides with “valuable” and “precious metal,” people believe that they should be worth a significant amount and purchase gold plated coins with that thought. The problem with these, however, is that, while they are gold plated, the gold plating is incredibly thin, only thin enough to give the appearance of gold. There is nothing wrong with owning gold-plated coins, with the most common being quarters, as long as you did not spend the overpriced prices for the coins. These are real quarters, plated by a third-party service, not the official US Mint. Because of that reason, many collectors even go as far as to claim these coins are damaged.

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16 Sep 2018

1915 Indian Head Quarter Eagle

Coins-United States | iccoins

Augustus Saint-Gaudens was one of the most well know coin designers in the world. President Roosevelt commissioned him to redesign the gold coins of the United States. Unfortunately, Saint-Gaudens passed away in 1907 and was not able to finish all the redesigns. A student of Saint-Gaudens, Bela Lyon Pratt, was commissioned to finish the projects. Pratt was the designer of the famous Indian Head quarter eagle and half eagle coins. This was a significant change from the traditional "Liberty" design of past US gold coinage. The designs were the same on both the quarter eagle, $2.50 coin, and half eagle, $5.00 coin. The Indian Head design was preceded by the Coronet Liberty Head coin designed by Christian Gobrecht. The Indian Head design is an incredibly unique coin but caused much displeasure when the coin was initially released. The coin, instead of the traditional raised design of coins, the Indian Head coins consisted of an incuse design or a design where the devices of the coin are lower than the field. The majority of Americans were not fans of the design of this coin, mostly due to its incuse design. Some even claimed it was a health hazard because bacteria could become trapped inside the deeper spots of the coin. Regardless of the problems, the coin was a very successful type.

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