Login

iccoins's Blog

27 Jan 2019

Learn Your Types: Two-Cent

Coins-United States | iccoins

The two-cent piece, minted from 1864 to 1873 was a short-lived and currently obsolete denomination from the US Mint. It was one of the shortest-lived denominations and issue of any United States coin. Around this time, the Mint was creating two-cent pieces and three-cent pieces, with the nickel three-cent coin replacing the silver design in 1865, one year after the first year of the two-cent piece. Just after the conclusion of the two-cent piece in 1873, the Mint began minting another popular obsolete denomination, the twenty-cent piece. This type was incredibly short lived, concluding in 1878, just 3 years after its introduction. Around this time, the US Mint seemed to have been obsessed with creating several different denominations until finally settling in on what you generally use today. The mintages of the two-cent coins started out strong, but dwindled down every year and 1873 was a proof-only year. The coin was designed by James Longacre and weighted 6.22 grams, double the weight of the bronze Indian Head Cent, also designed by Longacre and released the same year. The coin was composed of 95% copper, plus a5% tin and zinc combination. These coins, with a diameter of 23 millimeters are slightly larger than small cents. All two-cent pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint.

READ MORE
16 Dec 2018

US Bicentennial Coins (+ A Small Story)

Coins-United States | iccoins

The last few days have been incredibly busy for me. This week, I have finals in school for the end of semester one and then there’s winter break, which means lots of time for coin stuff! Anyways, today, my family and I went to the Weihnachtsmarkt (German Christmas Market) in Chicago and we passed by Harlan J. Berk. Unfortunately, the store wasn’t open, but I did see some awesome stuff in the window that I may go back and look at during the holidays. The window displayed several Mint State Morgans, as well as a very nice complete uncirculated set of Franklin Halves. I’ve always thought sets like that are very cool, but the fun of putting the set together is absent when you choose that route. Personally, that’s what I find to be the most exciting part…the hunt for the perfect coin. Even if you don’t have much to spend, no matter the coin, it can still be a hunt to find the one you want at the price you want. There were also a few commemorative coins that I really liked in the window. There were quite a few window shoppers, likely because it was nearby the market and was a common route to get there. Now for the main part of the blog about Bicentennial Coins:

READ MORE
12 Dec 2018

Learn Your Types: Franklin Half Dollar

Coins-United States | iccoins

The Franklin Half Dollar was designed by John R. Sinnock, who also designed the Roosevelt Dime, which was released two years before the Franklin Half Dollar, in 1946. The Franklin Half Dollar was minted from 1948 to 1963 and was the successor to the popular Walking Liberty Half Dollar, whose obverse design is also on the modern American Silver Eagle coins. In my opinion, the Franklin Half Dollar, along with the other coins released during this time, started the age when American coins began to seem much more boring and uninteresting. The reverse of the coin contains the Liberty Bell, which is the part of the coin that causes the designation, FBL, which means “Full Bell Lines.” On the Liberty Bell, near both the top and bottom, are lines. If the lines are uninterrupted or mushed together, that means the coin is very well struck and may receive the Full Bell Lines designation by the leading grading services.

READ MORE
07 Dec 2018

More Things To Never Do To Your Coins

| iccoins

My original article got very long, so I decided to break it up. I don’t want you to lose interest.

READ MORE
05 Dec 2018

How To Destroy Your Collection

Coins | iccoins

This is not a phrase people want to hear about their coin collection, but unfortunately, this happens every day to collectors who don’t know what to do, but mostly, don’t know what not to do. Some of these mistakes, surprisingly, are also done by professional collectors and dealers.

READ MORE
02 Dec 2018

Learn Your Types: Barber Quarter

Coins | iccoins

The Barber Quarter, also known as the Liberty Head Quarter, was minted between 1892and 1916 andwasprecededbythe Seated Liberty Quarter and wassucceededby the Standing Liberty Quarter. These coins were designed by Charles E. Barber, hence the name Barber. The reason they are also known as the Liberty Head Quarter is because the head on the obverse is that of Lady Liberty. A common complaint about this coin is that many believe theportraitlooks much more like a man than a woman. Many would be led to believe that is Mr. Liberty, but it is not.Thecoin weighs 6.25 grams and is composed of 90% silver and 10% copper. It has a diameter of 24.3, all the same as the previous Seated Liberty series and the Standing Liberty Quarters. These coins have the same obverse and reverse design as the Half Dollar and Dime of the time, both which were also designed by Charles E. Barber. In 1892, the coinhastwo differentvarieties, one with a larger eagle and one with a smaller eagle on the reverse. The coins were minted in Philadelphia, Denver, New Orleans, and San Francisco. All proof coins were struck at the Philadelphia Mint. This series is generally low on errors, as the machinery forstrikingthe coins were greatly improved.

READ MORE
29 Nov 2018

Numismatic Gifts

Coins | iccoins

With Black Friday just passed and the holiday season just around the corner, it’s time to start looking for gifts for your family and friends. If you have a friend who is a collector, these are some of the perfect gifts that you really can’t go wrong with.

READ MORE
23 Nov 2018

Learn Your Types: Seated Liberty Half Dollar

Coins | iccoins

Happy Thanksgiving (Day After)!

READ MORE
19 Nov 2018

Learn Your Types: Classic Head Half Cent

Coins | iccoins

The Classic Head Half Cent, designed by John Reich, is one of the many different types of "obsoleteUS coins," coins whose denominations are no longer minted. Half Cent, Two Cent, Three Cent, HalfDime, and Twenty-Cent Pieces all fall within this category. The Classic Head Half Cent was the successor to the Draped Bust Half Cent and had the same specifications, 100% copper, a23.5-millimeterdiameter, and a weight of 5.44 grams. The Classic Head Half Cent had a mintage run from 1809 to 1836, but there were large gaps in themintage. No half cent coins were minted from 1812 to 1824, 1827, or 1830. There are two proof only dates in the series, 1831 and 1836. 1835 was the last year of circulation strikes for the Classic Head Half Cent and it was replaced by the Braided Hair Half Cent in 1840. All half cent coins were significantly smaller than the large cent variants, but are still much larger than the small cents of today. In 1831, the US Mint changed the die for the Half Cent and also purchased new equipment which made the rims of 1831 to 1836 coins slightly higher than pre-1831 examples.

READ MORE
15 Nov 2018

The Basics

Coins | iccoins

If you’re just starting to get into coins, there’s a lot you don’t know. Even if you’ve been in the hobby for decades, you still don’t know most things about coins. If you’re a beginner, don’t feel like you need to learn everything, but also don’t skip the learning and the reading. It’s important to learn how to be a collector and to learn about the coins you are buying, but you aren’t going to be an expert in a few months. Following are some tips for starting out.

READ MORE

Money.org Blog and Forum Terms & Conditions of Use / Disclaimer

This is a community-sourced blog. Any views or opinions represented in this blog are personal and belong solely to the blog post’s author, and do not represent the views or opinions of the American Numismatic Association, and may not represent the views or opinions of people, institutions or organizations that the author may or may not be associated with in professional or personal capacity.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The American Numismatic Association (ANA) makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The ANA does not monitor the blog on a constant basis.

The ANA will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information, nor for the availability of this information. The ANA will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.

Downloadable Files and Images

Any downloadable file, including but not limited to pdfs, docs, jpegs, pngs, is provided at the user’s own risk. The ANA will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages resulting from a corrupted or damaged file.

Blog/Forum Posts and Comments

In these terms and conditions, “user content” means material including without limitation text, images, audio material, video material, and audio-visual material that you submit to this website, for whatever purpose.

Blog/forum posts and comments are encouraged. However, the ANA reserves the right to edit or delete any blog/forum posts or comments without notice. User content deemed to fall under the following categories will be removed and may prompt disciplinary actions, including, but not limited to, review and suspension/revocation of blog and forum privileges:

  • User content deemed to be spam or questionable spam.
  • User content intended for commercial purposes or to buy, sell or trade items.
  • User content containing profanity.
  • User content containing language or concepts that could be deemed offensive.
  • User content containing hate speech, credible threats, or direct attacks on an individual or group.

In addition, user content shall not be illegal or unlawful, shall not infringe any third party’s legal rights, and shall not be capable of giving rise to legal action whether against you, the ANA, or a third party under any applicable law.

The ANA may terminate your access to all or any part of the website at any time, with or without cause, with or without notice, effective immediately. If you wish to terminate this Agreement or your Money.org account (if you have one), you may simply discontinue using the website. All provisions of this Agreement which by their nature should survive termination shall survive termination, including, without limitation, ownership provisions, warranty disclaimers, indemnity and limitations of liability.

The ANA reserves the right to display advertisements on your account and blog pages.

This blog’s terms & conditions of use / disclaimer is subject to change at anytime.

We use cookies to provide users the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you agree to receive all cookies on money.org. You may disable cookies at any time using your internet browser configuration. By continuing to use this website, you agree to our privacy policy and terms of use. To learn more about how we use cookies and to review our privacy policy, click here.