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iccoins's Blog

24 Sep 2017

5 Top Coin Series To Collect

Coins-United States | iccoins

What do I collect? What do I do? What even is a coin? Those might be a few questions floating through your head. 

If you are just starting coin collecting, you probably have no idea where to start. A good place to start as a beginner is to attempt to fill basic sets. Doing an online search will come up with several coin folder sets you can start with. What are some sets that won't be too overwhelming?

1. Lincoln Cent (1909-Date)

The Lincoln cents have been around for as long as you've been alive unless you're older than 107. It started off with the wheat cents, then to the memorial cents, then for 2009, the centennial cents, then since then, the shield cents. While that may sound overwhelming, you probably have at least one memorial and one shield cent somewhere in your home or in your pocket. Starting with this set will urge you to look at every coin you receive, which is the first step to being a coin collector.

Why is the Lincoln Cent a good start?

  • Cheap ($0.01 each, $25.00 for a box at the bank)
  • Common (over 10 billion were minted in 2000 alone)
  • Searchable (pay with cash, probably receive some pennies)

2. Buffalo Nickels (1913-1938)

Buffalo nickels are very popular in the coin collecting community and is another very good start. It is quite a bit more expensive than the Lincoln cents as you won't find them in pocket change, but this would also show you the world of shopping for coins. 

Why is the Buffalo Nickel a good start?

  • Affordable (cheaper than trying to collect the shield nickels)
  • Popular (almost every coin collector knows about them)
  • Easy to find (go to a coin dealer, coin show, etc, and you'll find some)

3. Mercury Dimes (1916-1945)

Mercury dimes are also very popular, with their well-known, timeless design and value. It is also known as the Winged Liberty Dime. 

Why is the Mercury Dime a good start?

  • Affordable (uncirculated examples are easy to find at your local dealer)
  • Popular (another one that's popular)
  • Design (the design of the Mercury dime is one of another)
  • Silver (silver in every one)

4. National Park Quarters (2010-2020)

Back to the modern coins, the National Park quarters, as with the state quarters, are excellent starts for any coin collector. There are multiple releases every year.

Why is the National Park Quarter a good start?

  • Affordable ($0.25 each)
  • Easy To Find (find them in change)
  • Design (new designs every year makes for an exciting collection)

5. State Quarters (1999-2008)

For some more modern, easy to find coinage, the state quarters, are excellent starts for any coin collector. There were multiple releases every year, which allows for a plentiful collection. While the state quarter series had ended before the national park quarters, they are still easy to find in pocket change and actually made a comeback for the numismatics community. Many non-collectors began collecting these coins and then continuing onto other coins later in the program and after the program ended. 

Why is the State Quarter a good start?

  • Affordable ($0.25 each)
  • Easy To Find (find them in change)
  • Design (new designs every year makes for an exciting collection)


Comments

Mike

Level 7

All good sets to start with. Very well said. I probably would suggest some of the same but always remember collect what you like. I have no problems with these suggestions. Just make sure you have fun doing it and you enjoy it. Thanks for sharing I enjoyed it Mike.

iccoins

Level 4

Exactly! If you don't like to collect something, don't collect it :)

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