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Longstrider's Blog

20 Dec 2020

BIRTHDAY MPC-SERIES 641

Paper Money-U.S. | Longstrider

The latest addition to my growing MPC collection was a birthday present from my wife, thanks babe. In the photos below you can view my new Series 641, $10 Third Printing MPC. It was graded by PMG as a 64 Choice Uncirculated EPQ or Exceptional Paper Quality. It has a Schwan number of S887-3. The serial number is kind of cool as well. The Plate Position is 24.

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20 Apr 2020

CHIEF HOLLOW HORN BEAR

Paper Money-U.S. | Longstrider

A few people here have been asking what we collect. Here is an example of something other than Peace Dollar VAMs that I collect when I see a nice one. This is my newest example of a Military Payment Certificate or MPC. This is, in my opinion, one of the most outstanding MPC we made. In fact the entire Series 692 has been described as the "Most American" of all the different series of MPC's.

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14 Mar 2019

AN HONEST WEAR AND TEAR CONFEDERATE NOTE

Paper Money-U.S. | Longstrider

This blog is about another of my Civil War bank notes. This one is a Type 62 or as they are also called a T-62. Although this one dollar bill is graded a modest VG 8 by PMG, I love it. It has a ton of wear. Used by a lot of people during a very dark period of our history. This note is from the Sixth Issue. That is an act of the Confederate government, that on March 23, 1863 authorizes the $50,000,000 be printed monthly from April 1863 to January 1864. This resulted in T-56 to T-63 notes. All the notes are dated April 6, 1863. All the notes printed as "Payable two years after a peace treaty. T-61-63 notes are marked payable 6 months after a peace treaty.

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26 May 2018

FEBRUARY 15th, 1864

Paper Money-U.S. | Longstrider

The note pictured below is a 1864 Confederate State of America Fifty Dollar bill. It is dated February 17th, 1864 and printed by Keatinge & Ball of Columbus, South Carolina. It was printed on high quality bank note paper. The total number of genuine notes issued was 1,671,444. I say genuine notes issued because even though the serial number of all the notes lawfully released were printed with a machine as a way to bamboozle counterfeiters, they were counterfeited in huge volumes in Havana, Cuba. The back of the T-66 was printed with a blue back and a red overprint the colors varied depending on how much ink was placed on the plate. The front has a range of color. It ranges a dusky dark pink to light red, dark red and a deep dark orange-red. The dark red commands the highest price. This type note is fairly common in all grades.

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10 Mar 2018

TO PAY FOR IMAGING OR NOT

Exonumia | Longstrider

Just this week I finally received the digital images I paid for when I had PMG grade my Civil War Currency T-41 Confederate note that I first blogged about on March 6th.. They email it to you. It seems the imaging department kept sending it to the wrong email address. Anyway, this gives me the opportunity to show the difference between my scan and PMG's professional work. This is a choice to pay for third party companies, whichever you are using, that comes up when you send in a coin or currency for grading and slabbing. First I should mention that PMG does not show the image on it's web site as NGC does. They simply send you the photos, front and back, in an email attachment. I was unaware of that little fact till it happened to me. I should say that the folks at PMG were very helpful in finding and sending me my lost photos. They also finished my note in about half the projected time. That NEVER happens! So, we are giving the choice of spending a bit more money. In this case it was $5.. Is it worth it? Is it better than you can do? Do you even want a photo of something in your hand?? These are all questions one has to answer for themselves. I show both examples below so you don't have to search for my older blog and can better compare them. What do you think? Personally, for $5 bucks, I feel it's well worth it. PMG's photos more closely show the true colors and detail of my note. My scan seems washed out and kind of transparent even though I did it in high resolution. That's my opinion. I could be wrong. Check them out and please leave me a comment on your opinion. Thanks for looking!

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15 Aug 2017

1899 $1 HORSE BLANKET NOTE

Paper Money-U.S. | Longstrider

Having decided to branch out into paper currency, has open up a whole new world for me. There is a lot of studying and research to do before buying anything. Lucky I love research and the knowledge it brings. It also is giving me a new look at history. This is the second note I took a chance on my new found knowledge and bid on and won a raw note! So far I have done pretty well on both. This is a Large Size,. Series of 1899 One Dollar Silver Certificate. Commonly called a horse blanket due to it's size. This particular design is called the Black Eagle Note. Official name of vignette is Eagle of the Capitol. A vignette is an ornamental element of a bank note. This particular note is a Fr#233. The Fr stands for Arthur L. and Ira S. Friedberg. He is the Breen of paper money. Each type of currency has a different number due to changes on it. In this case the number 233 denotes the two signatures on it. They are, here, Tehee and Burke. The Friedberg number can make a huge difference in price on the same style note. This note came back from PMG, the paper money arm of NGC, as a 30 Very Fine EPQ. The EPQ stands for Exceptional Paper Quality. The 30 means the note will be lightly circulated and may have light soiling. There will typically be seven to ten folds. I won this note at auction and paid a modest price for it. Even taking in the cost of grading, I did alright. I'm having a ton of fun with this new interest in Numismatics. I recommend that you take a look at it. Most people collect either coins or paper money, not both. I say try it all! Thanks for looking and I look forward to your comments!

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