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Mike 's Blog

01 Nov 2022

What's Wrong With This Painting??

Coins | Mike

Hi everyone. This will be short. The coin below was based on a famous painting. It shows George Washington crossing the Delaware. Now he turned out to be the first President of the United States. He is crossing the Delaware to attack the Hessians. Not what it doesn't tell you that the fifth President of the United States James Monroe is holding the Flag!! And we lost not one man!
It was supposed to be a tree pronged attack. Washington leading one group of boats and another to his left and one to his right. The two never made it across in time. I said boats. They were more like Pontoon like boates. They held horses and they all stood. Could he and his troops take Trenton he did.

The painting was done by Emanuel Gottleib Leutze a German born American. If I remember he painted it in1851. It was the fist time America used boates like those used at Normandy. I do not remember if they brought cannons. I believe they would have to. Two facts . One the flag he used was not created yet and James Monroe had crossed earlier with an advanced force. What I corrected is what is wrong with the Painting.! Here is a secret. Only 416 are graded in this grade empire all the sales.



Click on the painting for the full effect!!



....Look closely at the painting you can see horses in the boats!! They were big!!

Washington was worried about the crossing and did not know that his support did not make the crossing they got a very late start.But as you know your history it was a surprise and they won the day. What you might not know if he lost the day we could of lost the war. That's how important this crossing was.

How many knew that the fifth President was the Flag holder again done for effect. That's what makes this painting so important to our history. I for one love the quarter that was made about this very important crossing. It was never tested and everything was ridding on it. And its an ULTA cameo!!Somthing you don't wear.Its also for affect. And a proof coin is a way of manufacturing don't forget that.




...These men made this crossing and fought a winning battle some with just socks on there feet.It was very cold. But they knew the importance of this battle. A great painting Great men. Two great Presidents And a great win. And a quarter tells the story not me. Like all our coins they tell our history. Sorry I know its short but my hands aren't up to it. But I wanted to let you know it was more than a painting. It was real and it happened and we won . Thanks Mike.

Comments

Nice coin.

Mike

Level 7

I suggest you read the blog. This speed reading doesn't teach you anything

Mal_ANA_YN

Level 5

I did not know that either. Wonderful piece of history.

It's Mokie

Level 6

I think it is a superb design for our quarter, one of the best all time. I have that same one in MS69 both clad and silver, that is how much I love it. Thanks for sharing your historical perspective. Always enjoy!!!!

Kepi

Level 6

Great painting indeed! Thanks for the history lesson! ; )

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Learned some history today, thanks!

I didn't know that james madison was holding the flag!

Longstrider

Level 6

What a history lesson. I was totally clueless about Monroe. Great job Mike. I shall reread this to take it all in. Thanks.

Kevin Leab

Level 4

Beautiful coin and very valuable history there. Thanks Mike!!

Rebelfire76

Level 4

Great history lesson Mike. I did not know that the painting depicted James Monroe holding the flag. Quite interesting the company that surrounded Washington. Your PF70 Crossing the Delaware silver quarter looks great as well my friend.

"SUN"

Level 6

I did not know that about James Monroe. Thanks for sharing the blog.

Golfer

Level 5

Beautiful silver coin! Proof 70. Great history lesson for sure. True courage back then, and thankfully they succeeded. Thanks for a very nice coin and history blog.

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