Login

CMCC's Blog

12 Feb 2015

Storing Your Coins

Coins | CMCC

I have seen in many blogs and forums people who are asking the best way how to store their coins. I am making this blog to ask a few questions myself and to answer some questions as well.


Pictured are the various ways that I store my coins: I have an Album for Lincoln Cents from 1909-1995, 10 Folders, 4 2x3 cases, and a million 2x2's. Also pictures is one of my 22 pages (1/2 occupied) for holding 2x2's. One thing that I did not include in the picture (I wish I had) are rolls.

Albums: Albums are like folders which protect your coins much better than do folders, as folders have their coins in the open, while albums have them behind windows. Albums can hold much more than folders; It takes two folders to hold Lincoln Cents from 1909-1974, but it takes only one album to hold Lincoln Cents from 1909-1995, and albums also have holes for proof's from 1975-1995! The main negative things about albums is that they they take up more room (usually not so bad), and they are expensive. To get three lincoln cent folders from 1909-2013, it costs $12.00, but to get the album, it costs $30.00. I am slowly saving for new albums, but they are more expensive, so I would recommend them for high grade coins.

Folders: Folders are great for holding your coins, they lock in better than albums, but they are in open air, my cousin once admired my Gem BU 1955-S Wheat Cent by rubbing his finger on it :( It left a little bit of impairment, but it is still BU. Folders are cheap, only $4.00 apiece. If you are a collector of OLD coins, like capped bust coinage, discontinued denominations, or even barber coins, these folders are not for you. There are no Half Cent, Large Cent, Two Cent, Three Cent, or Half Dime folders. There are no Shield Nickel Folders, Barbers and older don't have folders, and Morgan Dollars do not have folders. I would recommend these to you if you are okay without a uniform look, and only for low grade coins, like Liberty Nickels. I someday want all my coins to be in Albums, but that may be decades.

2x3 Cases: 2x3 Cases are beautiful and protect coins safely. I only have four cases: Three Westward Journey Nickel Set (All 3 Mints), and One for my AU+ Morgan Dollar, that of which I want two more for my other Morgan Dollars. These have beautiful designs, and I trust them to even house Unc. coins and Gem Proofs. Whitman even sells and box that houses 20 of them. Whitman even makes 3x5's, but they are bigger, and I prefer 2x3's.

Cardboard 2x2's: These house coins reasonably safe. I put better coins, like BU's and buffalo nickels, silver dimes, etc. in them. These cost 4-5 cents apiece but must be bought in lots of 100 or more. I bought a pack of whitman items for $30.00, which had 300 cent/dime 2x2's and 300 nickel/quarter.

2x2 Pages: I buy these from the local coin store at $1.00 apiece. Each of these pages have 20 pockets for 2x2's and can be stored in binders. A reasonable size for binders is 2".


If you have any opinions beside these, please comment and ask me.

Comments

user_9011

Level 2

I can save space in my fire proof safe by laying the Whitman albums (12 ) on their sides as opposed to upright. Is this a good idea?

ShriekenGriffon

Level 5

Great info!

Kepi

Level 6

I like the Dansco Albums for my Mercury Dimes and Buffalo Nickels. I also the 2x2 cardboard holders and put those in plastic pages in a binder. All seems to work well.

CMCC

Level 5

I had thought of Dansco albums, but I think I'll just stick with Whitman.

cardboard 2x2s.

Isaiah1801

Level 4

Good storage ideas

Isaiah1801

Level 4

I use cardboard holders from H.E. Harris and albums

We use cookies to provide users the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you agree to receive all cookies on money.org. You may disable cookies at any time using your internet browser configuration. By continuing to use this website, you agree to our privacy policy and terms of use. To learn more about how we use cookies and to review our privacy policy, click here.