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CA, Coins and cash's Blog

17 Nov 2021

A guide to trimes/US three cent pieces

| CA, Coins and cash

The trime also known as the silver 3 cent piece was the smallest piece ever minted by the United States Mint.
When it comes to trimes, or any coin for that matter CONDITION IS KEY! the trime is a more valuable coin, but only in better condition.Depending on what date is the trime will be more valuable, the main key date (a key date is one of the more rare dates of the series) is 1872, WITH ONLY1000 MINTED! Imagine that! with 7billion people in the world less then 1000 people own this coin not to mention in better condition. This coin have a valueof about $1000 in USD in about f12 condition ranging up to about $4000 USD in MS63. Overall this is a very cool coin and i hope to have one in my collection some day.

Comments

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Nice trimes are hard to come by. I rarely see then in coin shops above xf40. I did obtain an ms 64 for one of my retirement presents. That was pricy too

Kevin Leab

Level 4

Good blog.....with only 1000 minted you have to wonder how many have survived to present day. Small coins are easily lost. I've collected the 3 cent nickels and your blog has inspired me to start this series. Thanks!!

Kepi

Level 6

Nice blog! Thanks for the information! ; )

slybluenote

Level 5

I wouldn’t mind owning one of those myself! Thanks for sharing!

Longstrider

Level 6

Nice blog. Are you inn Canada.? I recognize the f12. Good job.

i am just saying the grade from my guide book

no?

Mal_ANA_YN

Level 5

a rare coin indeed.

AC coin$

Level 6

I would love to have one . I do own one very tiny Lincoln penny.

nice

Mike

Level 7

I have a few. But stopped for some reason. Thanks for the blog

Golfer

Level 5

1872. Might go after one. Owning 1 of a thousand would be awesome.

yep

What are some of your favorite coins?

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