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AC coin$'s Blog

29 May 2022

1893, 1894, 1895, 1897 & 1899 Indian Head Cents

Coins-United States | AC coin$

US Indian Head Cents:
1893
1894
1895
1897
1899

Magnificent USA was in the midst of completing the last trends of Westward Expansion, the 'gold rush' era was transforming some Western points. America was becoming more urban as many large cities expanden their outskirts as well.


The Indian Head Cent was designed and engraved by James Barton Longacre since 1859 and minted until 1909. It depicts on the obverse a lady "Liberty" wearing an American Native Headdress.


Within the shown years above, from 1893 to 1896 the Nation's President was Grover Cleveland and from 1897 thru 1899 the President was William McKinley. The Union was made at that time still of 42 states, being Utah in 1896 the last one to enter into the Federation.


A glorious country in the path of modernization, the first gasoline powered car was teste on September 20th., 1893 in Springfield, Massachusetts by the Duryea Brothers. Enjoy this sample of my Indian Head Cents' collection.

In my own words.

For further details about this item and others please visit my collections section.

AC Coin$

Freedom. "Never give up."

"In God we trust."

Comments

Jackson14

Level 4

Cool!

AC coin$

Level 6

Thanks always for your visit and comments.

Rebelfire76

Level 4

These are some fine examples. I found my first Indian Head cent at a Boy Scout Camp Reservation, and just kind of held on it. Appreciate the history you provided in regards to the cent and where the United States was as a country at the time.

AC coin$

Level 6

Thanks for you comment .

Kepi

Level 6

Nice coins! ; )

AC coin$

Level 6

Thanks .

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