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Dragonfire's Blog

02 Apr 2022

2007 First Spouse Gold $10 Coins

Coins-United States | Dragonfire

The first spouse $10 gold coin program is a program that honors the first spouses by issuing a $10 gold coin to commemorate them. These first spouse gold coins were released with the same schedule as the presidential dollars.

The obverse of these coins depict the date, the order of their terms as first spouse, the word "Liberty," the words "In God We Trust," as well as a portrait of the first spouse and the first spouse's name. The reverse of each coin is unique to that first spouse, depicting a portrait that was symbolic of that first spouse's life and work, and the words "The United States of America," "E Pluribus Unum," "½ oz," "$10," and "0.9999 fine gold."

Four Presidents, who all were not married when they were in office, were represented by images which are symbolic of Liberty. These four presidents are Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren, and James Buchanan.

The first four of these first spouse $10 gold coins are what I will be writing about today. These four coins, the Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, the first of the liberty coins, which was the Thomas Jefferson Liberty coin, and the Dolley Madison gold coins, were all minted in 2007.

The first of these first spouse $10 gold coins is the Martha Washington gold coin. The reverse of this coin depicts Martha Washington sewing a button onto George Washington's Uniform Jacket. During the Revolutionary War, Martha Washington was extremely concerned with the well-being of the Colonial Soldiers. This earned her alot of respect and admiration from the Colonial Soldiers.

The second gold coin is the Abigail Adams $10 gold coin. The Abigail Adams Gold coin depicts of Abigail Adams writing one of her most memorable letter, in which she requested that John Adams "Remember The Ladies," while creating the framework of the United States.

The third gold coin is the Thomas Jefferson Liberty gold coin. Due to the fact that Thomas Jefferson was not married during his term as president, there was no first spouse to base a coin on. To fix this, the mint put a picture of Liberty on the coin's obverse and a picture of Thomas Jefferson's grave at Monticello on the reverse.

The fourth and final 2007 first spouse gold coin is the Dolley Madison gold coin. The Dolley Madison gold coin's reverse depicts Dolley Madison saving a portrait of George Washington, which was made by Gilbert Stuart. In 1814, British troops were coming for the White House. These British troops set fire to the White House. One of the most famous acts was saving the portrait of the former president and some Cabinet papers. Thanks to this act, the portrait of George Washington still hangs in the White House.


I am sorry to say that I do not have any original picture of any First Spouse $10 gold coins.

My sources for this blog are the U.S. Mint Website and Wikipedia

Comments

Mal_ANA_YN

Level 5

An under appreciated series. Photos would be wonderful.

Kepi

Level 6

Nice blog! Pictures would be great and your sources. ; )

AC coin$

Level 6

New subject matter on those spouse's coin issues. Pictures would have been nice. Great job .

Longstrider

Level 6

I like your blog. An often overlooked series. How about a bibliography? Just a hint and my opinion. Nicely done.

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Well, Thomas Jefferson was married to Martha who died before he was president.

Mike

Level 7

Pictures on the web. Take a picture send it to your picture storage and put it on your blog. Make sure there not copyright. I enjoyed your blog. But as you see in most blogs pictures tell half the story!! Keep up the good work!

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