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I. R. Bama's Blog

03 Jul 2020

Mint Error, What type?

Coins-United States | I. R. Bama

One of my most favorite coins is the Flying Eagle Cent series. This is also my first mint error coin that I bought. I need help in identifying this error. I have two guesses, I'm not sure either is correct. The first most likely is a die break. The second I'm sure couldn't be is a sintered planchet. This is defined as a planchet that picks up a layer of metal dust when it sticks in the annealing drum longer than normal, forming a hard copper or black coating on the planchet that strikes through the actual striking of the coin. (ANA Introduction to Coin Collecting Correspondence Course). The main reason I doubt that is because of the rarity of that error. Only about 50 are know, So I am inviting you all to help me with this and further my education.
This is also the first picture I took with my plug in usb magnifier. A hand held shot. I'll try to replace it a little later with a better photo.

Comments

Long Beard

Level 5

As the majority I'm leaning towards a lamination. Although not quite as predominant as that found commonly on Peace Dollars which I'm more familiar with. Since I haven't seen many copper/nickel laminations I leave that to the specialists for confirmation.

Harrison

Level 3

My guess is a lamination error or what you said something with the strike. If it is a lamination error those don't bring much of a premium. Also a lovely coin, great blog.

Golfer

Level 5

Looks like a lamination issue. Something may of interfered with the strike. Ive seen other coins like this. Don't think they command much of an error premium though. Thanks for posting.

slybluenote

Level 5

That's an old coin Bama ! I couldn't be of any help on the error though. I'm relatively new to numismatics, so I don't have a clue as to what kind of error it is. Good luck with finding out!

I would go with a lamination flaw. It's hard to tell with the spicture, but it looks as though the part of that design is still visible and whole, just that it is incuse just below the rest of the coin. Lovely coin, great pickup!

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Strike error sounds right in time when I look up examples. Does it add to the value of a mediocre coin grade?

Mokie

Level 6

I am with the consensus on this and also believe it to be a strike- through error. But a better picture would help.

Longstrider

Level 6

Hard to tell from this photo. My GUESS would be a strike through or some kind of planchet de-lamination. Check out CONECA. They are THE error people. You can also look here to get an idea: https://www.sullivannumismatics.com/coin/ngc-1c-1858-flying-eagle-cent-struck-thru-obverse-reverse-xf40 Good luck. Cool coin. Let us know how it turns out. Thanks.

JudeA

Level 4

Actually that looks like lamination. I have a 194- something (I can't remember the last digit at the moment, that I believe has a lamination error as well. It could be PMD, but I'm not sure.

coinsbygary

Level 5

It could be a strike-through meaning that there was some sort of foreign substance on the planchet. Strike throughs are more common through grease on the planchet. Strike throughs don't necessarily have to be from sintered planchets. I have a large cent that appears rough around Liberty's truncated neck that I think is struck through grease.

Mike

Level 7

I really canvases with the coin on an angle. If it was looking straight down maybe I could tell. I have the same year. I only have a few. But I always liked them. I hope someone can see it. Good luck my friend.

I. R. Bama

Level 5

I had to angle it because of the glare from the camera

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Now that I see it on the blog, the error looks to be incused and somewhat in the shape of the eagle's head and beak..... Clashed die perhaps?

JudeA

Level 4

Definitely not a clashed die, I'm not really sure what kind of error it is. My best guess is some sort of die chip.

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