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World_Coin_Nut's Blog

23 Mar 2021

Swedish Numismatics

| World_Coin_Nut

I have found myself recently drawn to the coinage of Sweden. Being a world coin collector, I have always had some coins from Sweden in my collection but I think that I am starting to appreciate them more. There aren’t many (at least in the United States) collectors to compete with. The designs tend to be simple.

My first real purchase was 1724 dated, ½ Daler, piece of plate money. Since that time, I had added a 2 Daler and 4 Daler. If you like large, crude coins then these were made for you. The 4 Daler piece weighs over 4 pounds. Swedish copper plate money was introduced due to the abundance of copper from Sweden’s mines and the lack of availability of silver and gold. These cumbersome coins were issued in copper bullion with content reflecting the value of the silver that they replaced. These highly collectible “coins” circulated throughout Sweden and Finland.

#1
Uncertain date butt attributed to correct ruler.
Obverse: Corner stamps: Crowned FRS, date. Center stamp: 4 DALER SILF: MYNT, crossed arrows
Ruler: Frederick I
Composition: Copper


Most pieces of plate money available to collectors today were recovered from the shipwreck of the trading vessel Nicobar in the 1980’s. Almost all, including mine, display shipwreck effect degradation. Plate money was minted in denominations of up 10 Daler with pieces weighing over 40 pounds.
Crude, large copper coinage was abundant in 16th and 17th century Sweden.

#2
Charles XI. 1660-1697. AE. Avesta mint, 1662. C. R. S. above crowned arms dividing 16 - 62; shield of arms containing lion rampant left and ornamented on left and right sides / Crowned arms containing 3 shields dividing 2. - ÖR / K: - M: privy mark at bottom, aVF, Somewhat rough surfaces. Key date of series.
Obverse: C R S above crowned ornamented shield, date
Reverse: Crown above shield with three crowns, value
Composition: Copper
Diameter: 42.4 mm
Weight: 34.88g
#3
Obverse: Warrior with sword and shield, date below
Obverse Legend: WETT OCH WAPEN
Reverse: Value in shield
Subject: Reason and Arms
Ruler: Carl XII
Composition: Copper
Weight: 4.5000g

This is one of my favorite coins of Sweden. It isn’t as crude or large but I find it to be quite pleasing.

Large, crude copper coins are what originally drew me to world coins. I had been working on a collection of US large cents and got to the point where everything I needed was pricey. You can build a nice collection of world copper coins on a budget.

Sticking with the crude theme, there are 2 Swedish Klippe’s in my collection.

#4
1565 16 Ore
Obverse: Crown above cartouche with ER within dividing denomination
Reverse: Crowned cartouche with 3 crowns withing dividing date
Ruler: Eric XIV
Composition: Silver
#5
1625 Ore
Obverse: 3 Crowns, A above, GR
Reverse: 2 Crossed arrows
Composition: Copper
Weight: 28.3000g

When Sweden got around to making silver coins more frequently, they still liked to make them big.

#6
Sweden, Carl XIV Johan, 1818-1844, 1834 CB, 1 Riksdaler, EF, Carl XIV Johan, 1818-1844. Dav. 352, KM# 632.
Obverse: Head right
Obverse Legend: CARL XIV SVERIGES...
Reverse: Crowned arms within order chain divides date and value
Ruler: Carl XIV Johan
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 34.0000g
#7
Sweden, Karl XV., 1859-1872., 1869 ST, 4 Riksdaler Riksmynt, AU, Karl XV., 1859-1872. Dav. 356, KM# 711. Raised planchet flaw behind the head on obv.
Obverse: Head right
Obverse Legend: CARL XV SVERIGES...
Reverse: Crowned arms with supporters, date, and value below
Ruler: Carl XV Adolf
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 34.0061g

I don’t consider myself a collector of Swedish coins but I have picked up a number of them over the past years.

Sources:
NGCcoin.com
www.swedishcoppers.com
Wikipedia

Comments

Stumpy

Level 5

Wonderful coins, very interesting information! Thanks!

slybluenote

Level 5

Great blog WCN ! Very interesting topic of which I knew nothing. Nice collection you have there! Thanks for sharing.

Golfer

Level 5

Awesome information. Thanks

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Very nice blog! You know I never thought we were in a competition.....

Long Beard

Level 5

I found myself shifting more towards world coinage in the past few years. Those Swedes sure do have some nice coin designs.

Mr. B Coins

Level 4

beautiful coins. An interesting blog. thank you for topic I knew nothing about. Good Luck cornering the market. Mr. B

Mr. B Coins

Level 4

beautiful coins. An interesting blog. thank you for topic I knew nothing about. Good Luck cornering the market. Mr. B

TheNumisMaster

Level 5

Very nice blog! Swedish money, especially plate money, has really caught my eye as of late. I might purchase some! Cheers!

Mokie

Level 6

A friend of mine won best of show at the Pittsburgh National Money Show in 2019 with his display of Swedish Plate Money, a very very interesting series. Thanks for sharing your collection.

Kepi

Level 6

This is so cool! Beautiful coins! That's wild...a 40 pound plate money... you'd need big pockets. haha Thanks for such an interesting blog!

40 pounds... wow. Nice blog.

Mike

Level 7

I don't know how you do it. Those are fabulish. I think a 40 pound coin wouldn't fit in my pocket. The large one I can see markings on it. . The top right and the circle in the center with a marking in that.! It's always good to read great blogs like this. Chris I have to say I like them all. The history is great and your research must of taken a while. But I would of never learned about these. Sharing back and forth. But these are remarkable. Thank you very much . I appreciate it . I did read it twice especially the history of each one.

World_Coin_Nut

Level 5

Glad you enjoyed it, Mike. Hopefully, sometime in the near future, my life will slow down enough to write more of these.

Longstrider

Level 6

Fantastic blog. I had no idea the plate money was so large. I agree with you in that they are very interesting. Nice collection. Good luck and thanks. Great photos.

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