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World_Coin_Nut's Blog

03 Jan 2021

Ferdinand III Thaler

Coins-World | World_Coin_Nut

Here is a new addition to my Thaler collection. Hungary isn’t my normal collecting focus but the large diameter and nice strike were really appealing to me.Diameter: 46mmWeight: 28.54 gKörmöcbánya (Kremnitz) mint.Obverse: Laureate, armored, and draped bust rightReversed: Crowned double-headed eagle, holding sword and scepter; crowned and collared coat-of-arms on breast.Huszár 1241; KM 107; Davenport 3198Ferdinand III was from 1621 Archduke of Austria, King of Hungary from 1625, King of Croatia and Bohemia from 1627, and Holy Roman Emperor from 1637 until his death in 1657. Sounds like he had a lot on his plate.

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12 Nov 2020

White Swan Mine Thaler

Coins-World | World_Coin_Nut

Charles (German: Karl), Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, reigned as Prince of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel from 1735 until his death in March of 1780.

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10 Oct 2020

Death of August der Jüngere

Coins-World | World_Coin_Nut

Augustus II, called the Younger (August der Jüngere), was Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. In the estate division of the House of Welf of 1635, he received the Principality of Wolfenbüttel which he ruled until his death. Considered one of the most literate princes of his time, he is known for founding the Herzog August Library at his Wolfenbüttel residence, then the largest collection of books and manuscripts north of the Alps.He is an important part of German history. He first came on my radar because of my fascination with Wildman coins. August II had a plethora of Wildman coins minted in his name. I have done presentations, exhibits, etc on Wildman coins enough times that it almost feels like I knew him.This is a recent acquisition that I have had on my radar for at least a year. It just made sense to add a Thaler commemorating his death to my collection since I have so many minted during his life.Here is my description:Obverse: Legend in 11 linesObverse Translation: Born April 10 1579 during the lead but accompanies his years of work. Died September 17 1666. Lived 87 years, 5 months and 7 daysReverse: Bare tree with skull at baseReverse Translation: Happy about the green foliage. So the glory of the world. dells. The advice of all things, not only to the provident and active.Subject: Death of August IIMint: ZellerfeldMintmaster: Most likely Henning SchluterNote: Dav. #6376.Composition: SilverI used Google translate for the legend translation. I’m sure it is close but as you can see it is kind of clunky. Anybody out there that wants to give a better suggestion for the translation, feel free.As you can see this piece has a Halloween kind of vibe to it so it seemed like the perfect time to close the deal on one.

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31 Aug 2020

Baptismal Thalers

Coins - World | World_Coin_Nut

I don’t consider myself to be a religious person, more “spiritual”. I know kind of hippie sounding but it’s as good a description as any. I grew up in a semi-religious family and had my share of exposure to stories from the bible.Many coins from around the world have religious themes but my focus is on the coins of the German States. Coins minted before the German unification in 1871. A common image on these coins is the baptism of Christ by John the Baptist in Jordan. I honestly don’t know what drew me to these particular pieces aside from most of them being beautifully engraved.Photo#1SAXE-GOTHA-ALTENBURG 1692 ThalerGotha mint, Goppel-1135, Schnee-502Diameter: 40mmObverse: John the Baptist baptizing Christ in JordanObverse Legend: DIS IST MEIN LEIBER …Reverse: 9-line inscription, large ornament above, crossed palm branches below divide dateSubject: Baptismal ThalerRuler: Friedrich II​Photo#2Harz 1697 ThalerZellerfeld mint; Rudolf Bornemann, mintmaster, Fassbender 2792Diameter: 51.5mmObverse: St. John the Baptist kneeling right, baptizing Jesus Christ standing facing in River Jordan, hands crossed over breast; dove of the Holy Spirit and radiate name of God aboveReverse: Biblical passages in ten lines​Photo#3Hamburgca.16352 ThalerDiameter: 59mmObverse: The AnnunciationObverse Legend: AVE MARIA GRATIA. PLENA. DOMINVSReverse: The Baptism of ChristNote: Ref. G#1586. Prev. KM#F85.​Baptismal Thalers in general are a common theme but there are no issues that are individually better than scarce. Since they are such a popular theme a lot of collectors will find the price point to be unattainable. The last coin pictured is a restrike from the 1970’s that you may find have a more attractive price. You are going to pick them up for anywhere close to spot price but it has a much more attractive price.Photo#41762 Saxony Taler – 1977 Restrikef. Godfather. Baptism of Christ by Johannes d.T. / Engel holds (empty) cartridge, outline. in 2 linesGrade: ProofCatalog: Welter#2192Composition: SilverWeight: 25.17 gThe baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist is a major event in the life of Jesus which is described in three of the gospels: Matthew, Mark and Luke. It is considered to have taken place at Al-Maghtas, located in Jordan.Photo#5Gerard David –The Baptism of Christ, c. 1505​Most modern theologians view the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist as a historical event to which a high degree of certainty can be assigned. Along with the crucifixion of Jesus, most biblical scholars view it as one of the two historically certain facts about him and often use it as the starting point for the study of the historical Jesus.The baptism is one of the events in the narrative of the life of Jesus in the canonical Gospels; others include the Transfiguration, Crucifixion, Resurrection, and Ascension. Most Christian denominations view the baptism of Jesus as an important event and a basis for the Christian rite of baptism. In Eastern Christianity, Jesus' baptism is commemorated on January 6th. In the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion, the Lutheran Churches, and some other Western denominations, it is recalled on a day within the following week, the feast of the baptism of the Lord. In Roman Catholicism, the baptism of Jesus is one of the Luminous Mysteries sometimes added to the Rosary.This is the extent of my collection of Baptismal Thalers but I am sure there will be additions made in the future.

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25 Feb 2020

Lauthenthal Mining Thaler

Coins - World | World_Coin_Nut

As some of you have noticed I have been less active recently. Over the last 6 months or so my other commitments have kind of take over my life and the downtime I have has been greatly reduced. Some of this is work and some of it is numismatic related. In addition to that, I recently upgraded to life membership and that process caused a problem with my ANA account. That has all been fixed.Here is my latest addition to the numismatic family. I recently purchased this off of my favorite seller on MA-Shops.com. It had been on my watching list for over 6 months and I couldn’t bring myself to pull the trigger. This piece is way outside of my normal budget but I was recently able to sell off some unwanted items to help finance the acquisition. In addition, the seller was open to me making the purchase through a payment plan.Davenport shows 3 varieties of this piece in German Secular Talers 1600-1700 and surprisingly this is not one of them. I like collecting coins that are out of the ordinary. This one qualifies for a number of reasons. Mining Thaler’s from the 1600s, in general, are scarce. There are lots of varieties but I don’t consider any of them common. The depiction of St. Jacob also appealed to me. This is the only coin in my collection with him portrayed. I couldn’t find any link between him and the Lauthenthal area. In addition, it doesn’t appear that he was the patron saint of, well, anything.It does appear that there was/is a St. Jacobs church in Goslar am Harz which looks like it is about 25 miles away. The church has been existence since at least 1073 so it could be as simple as that.Maybe someone more versed in German history can shed some more light on this.Of all the appearances of all 4 varieties of these, this one appears to be better than most.Lautenthal, a town in the Harz Mountains of modern central Germany, was the site of a famous silver mine called “Lautenthal’s Luck.” Mining of copper, lead, and silver in the area around Lautenthal started about 1225. In the middle of the 14th century, however, the Harz was depopulated because of plague and mining came to an end.Miningin the Harz was started again in 1524. Lautenthal was founded in 1538 as a mining settlement on the river Laute, a small tributary of the Innerste, and had already been given the status of a town by 1580. Sixteen years later it became a free mining town. The town was enlarged in 1560 and a rectangular market place was laid out. A comparatively large town hall was built in 1570. The building was transformed into a hotel later. In 1626, the town was plundered by the troops of Johann Tserclaes, Count of Tilly in the Thirty Years' War. The Protestant town church was built 1649-59.

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