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coinfodder's Blog

09 Jun 2020

A Bold Prediction for the Future of Numismatics and the US Mint

Collecting Tips | coinfodder

Today's feature is a bold prediction for the next 10 years of numismatics.1. The death of the pennyYes. The penny, much to my chagrin, is probably going to be cut in the next ten years. The price of one penny is 1.8 cents, amounting to about 8 billion in annual losses. Not looking good for the finance budget. The zinc and copper industry and numismatists are trying to keep the penny going, but honestly, the penny will die soon. That is why I am hoarding them in hopes their value will rise slightly.2. The US Mint's over offeringAfter 2019's silver eagle fiasco and the announcement of the V75 eagles with crazy low mintage, I am sure that this will be a pattern with David Ryder for years to come. The US Mint is going to put out stuff no one wants or cares about.3. NGC and PCGS's riseYes, they are already pretty profitable, and NGC saved itself from destruction by conforming itself to conform with Florida governor Ron DeSantis's essential/non-essential guidelines. Yet, the two companies are growing. More and more people mad with the US Mint's cheap storage, are turning to third party certification to protect and grade coins. Which leads me too...4. The death of the art of gradingYes, coin grading will still exist. But now, with NGC and PCGS grading coins like madmen, less and less people will learn how to grade as many people will depend on the certification companies to grade it for them, leading to less and less people learning how to grade.5. The decline in popularity as a wholeAs the world becomes more digital, kids like me (Yes, I'm a Youth Numismatist) are becoming more enticed by things like video games (I could care less about video games), leading to a decrease of new collectors. This will be a big issue the ANA will have to counter, in some shape or form.So there you have it. The 5 bold predictions I made that will happen by 2030.

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03 Jun 2020

Littleton's Price Gouging- How to avoid It

Collecting Tips | coinfodder

Were going to take a break from the horrible coinage fails and talk about something else- Littleton Coin Company's constant price gouging. (Littleton please don't sue me, please)Manyard Sundman, the founder of Littleton, believed that expanding advertisements to the general media over sticking to collector magazines would push Littleton Coin Company to success. Which it did.Now, I firmly believe that Littleton is out to take advantage of the casual collector and rip every last dollar out of them.Take a set of 1880 O's graded F-8, for example. 10 coins come in the set. All of these coins are worth about $350. So Littleton decides to sell them for $800, calling them rare, and stating that we will never see them again. To add further insult to injury, their albums are around $25, and folders $4. What they don't want you to realize is that many places sell them for slightly cheaper. Barnes and Noble sells the folders for $3.50, and Wizard Coin Supply has both albums and folders at a surplus, much cheaper than Littleton. You can see how Littleton price gouges constantly, using buzzwords to trick you.The sad part is how they trick the unknowing. I mean, if collectors like us get scammed by them, it's on us because we know better. But they scam the general public into overpaying on coins that are worth much less.To avoid price gouging, look around. Ebay generally has better prices, and many other places have cheap deals on supplies.On yeah, Wizard sells Red Books for cheap. They sell them for normally around $10. But, the products (like a Mega Red I ordered one year) tend to come slightly damaged (I exchanged the book because I'm picky) but telling them to take care will do numbers in the care they place on your supplies.

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17 May 2020

Will it be Possible to Collect Every Type of Coin Again?

Collecting Tips | coinfodder

The last person to collect every single possible known coin passed away in 1976.Louis E. Eliasberg, of Baltimore, Maryland, was the last person, and to date only, person that has collected every single known coin and mintmark.Will this ever happen again?I say no. Here's why.

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15 Mar 2020

Will it be Possible to Collect Every Type of Coin Again?

Collecting Tips | coinfodder

The last person to collect every single possible known coin passed away in 1976.Louis E. Eliasberg, of Baltimore, Maryland, was the last person, and to date only, person that has collected every single known coin and mintmark.Will this ever happen again?I say no. Here's why.

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