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thatcoinguy's Blog

31 Aug 2021

Select Highlights From The Smithsonian Museum

Coins | thatcoinguy

Class Two 1804 Dollar: This dollar coin is one that you won't find in ANYONE'S collection: it's the only one in existence today. What is interesting about this coin is that it was originally a 1857 Swiss Thaler (the producer decided to strike the coin over another existing coin instead of making a planchet for it to be struck on).

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30 Aug 2021

The St. Gaudens 1933 Double Eagle: Part Two

Coins | thatcoinguy

The US realized their mistake around 1952, and requested the coin back. But World War II happened, and the return was delayed. Then, many of King Farouk's coins were auctioned off, one of which was the 33' double eagle. The US asked once again for the coin, and authorities in Egypt said they would comply, but the coin vanished. Until 1996.

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26 Aug 2021

The St. Gaudens 1933 Double Eagle: Part One

Coins | thatcoinguy

Originally, the 1933 double eagle was supposed to be a common circulating coin in commerce. There were 445,500 originally made in 1932, and they were set to release in early 1933. But before they could be released, the current president at the time (Franklin Delano Roosevelt), signed Executive Order 9102, in an attempt to end the 1930s bank crisis, which was caused by hoarding of coins. It outlawed the possession of gold coins made for circulation, with an exception for pieces made for collectors. All of the 1933 double eagles were supposedly melted except for two, which went to the Smithsonian National Institute. Were they all melted? Unbeknownst to the general public, 20 more of the gold coins (probably stolen by the US Mint chassier) survived and ended up in the hands of coin dealer Israel Switt, who sold the coins off individually to collectors.

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28 Jul 2021

Victor David Brenner: The Man Behind the Cent

Coins | thatcoinguy

ViktorasBaranauskaswas born June 12, 1871, inSiauliai, Lithuania. As soon as Viktoras was old enough, his father taught himskills for gem and seal engraving, along with sculpting, as that was the family trade.At age 19, Viktoras moved to New York City, and changed his name to Victor David Brenner in order to gain US citizenship faster. He was always interested in numismatics, and four year after moving to the US,he joined the American Numismatic and Archaeological Society. He had a passion for learning, and during his time in America, learned English and French. In 1898, Brenner decided that to continue his studies in engraving and sculpting, he would move to Paris, France. He was taught underOscar Roty of the Academie Julian School of Art, and started gaining public notice by winning multiple awards at the Paris Exhibition in 1900.

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