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CoinHunter's Blog

05 Apr 2021

Update on recent finds

Coins | CoinHunter

Hello y'all!Today my blog is going to be about a scramble of different things. So, first of all, I am going to talk about some of the downsides of ordering coins from a bank/credit union. I recently had my dad order a large amount of coins from my credit union, a box of half dollars, box of quarters, 2 boxes of nickels and 2 boxes of pennies. Now you may be thinking, hmmm... he is guaranteed to find something great out of all of that! Well, it didn't quite turn out like that. First off, the half dollar box was a box that I had turned in a while ago and expected them to get rid of (my first ever half dollar box). Second, all of the nickel and penny boxes were OBW (original bank wrapped) 2021 coins. Fourthly, I had ordered the quarter box for my brother, so in the end, I had nothing to hunt. And now finally, he didn't end up finding anything (besides some nice ones and 2009s) in the whole quarter box, I was really thinking that there would be a W or two in there. Anyways, as he was hunting through the quarter box, I hunted through the coins a second time to look for varieties and was rewarded with three: a Colorado doubled ear, Wyoming DDR-024, and an Arizona extra cactus. I am going to get rid of the nickels and probably keep both of the penny boxes for now. I hope to get and keep a brand new box of pennies for every year from now on as long as I still can I currently have a 2020 and a 2021 penny box. Now I am going to tell you guys that I finally got my hands on some Tuskegee airmen quarters from my mom and bros change, I now have 8, how are you guys doing at coming across them. Just so you guys know, the the new Crossing the Delaware quarters are supposed to be released into circulation today, so keep an eye out for them. Also I am going to show off my entry for the National Coin Week youth Activity, to enter, you have to be 17 or younger, the activity is to make some sort of food that relates to something numismatic, I made a wheat penny pizza for my entry, are any of you guys entering? Thanks for reading this blog and have a great day!

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16 Feb 2021

Numismatic Book Review, "Coin Hunting Made Easy"

Coins | CoinHunter

Hi guys! Today my blog is going to be a review of a great book I found on amazon for $9.99. This book is "Coin Hunting Made Easy" by Mark D Smith. It a fairly short read with 123 pages, but it more than makes up for its length with all of the information inside. This book is very informative, and it is fun to read because has some humor. It even has a "Learning the Lingo" section that goes over a bunch of words that us Numismatists use every day, but other people have never heard before. It goes over and defines words like Bag Marks, Bullion, Clad, and Denomination and for the word "Die" the beginning of his definition of the word is "this is what happens to me when I play video games and why I have decided to stop" but of course he is just kidding like he does once and a while throughout his book. This book also teaches its readers about important things like errors, mintmarks, the coin grading scale, things you may need, understanding coin roll values, how to plan your route to get coins, dealing with bank tellers, best times to go hunting, supply vs demand, ordering coins from your bank, how to take care of your finds, and what to look for. Additionally, it goes over all the different denominations and the different designs of coins you might find. And it explains his first coin roll hunting experience (he basically hit the jackpot). Over all I think it is a great read for beginners and experts (like me ;) ) alike, with its short amount of pages and low price even young kids could probably get there hands on this awesome book. Thanks for reading this review and have a great day!

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02 Feb 2021

The Silver Jefferson Nickel

Coins | CoinHunter

Hi guys! Today my blog is going to be about silver Jefferson Nickels, or as I am going to refer to them in this blog "War Nickels". The first thing to know about war nickels is that they were made to preserve nickel for the war effort. The two things that make war nickels different is their composition and the location of the mintmark. The Mint decided to place the mintmark above the Monticello Building on the reverse of the coin, and they also decided to make the mintmark a lot larger than normal, making it easy to tell them apart from other nickels even they are not very silvery looking. They were made of 35% silver, 56% Copper, and 6% manganese. As a result of their different, unusual composition, they typically have a weird look to them that also makes them stand out. One thing I have noticed noticed that is that errors/varieties seem easy to find on war nickels, the reason I say this is because one time I hunted a $100 dollar box of nickels and found 2 war nickels in the box, but the interesting thing is that they both had a type of error. One of them had cool die cracks on the reverse, while the other had some cool lamination errors on the obverse, please see the pics below. Thanks for reading my blog! And have a great day!

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25 Jan 2021

The REAL gold dollar

Coins | CoinHunter

Hi guys! Today my blog is going to be about gold dollars, so let's begin. The gold dollar, the smallest denomination regular issue US gold coin, first appeared in 1849, when the government introduced two new denominations, the dollar and double eagle, to exploit wast quantities of yellow metal coming to the East from the California Gold Rush. Gold dollars were minted continuously from 1849 through 1889, although mintages were largely restricted after the Civil War. Today most of the demand for gold dollars comes from type coin collectors, who desire one each of the three different design variations. Type I gold dollars, with Miss Liberty's portrait identical to that used on the $20 double eagle, were made from 1849 through 1854, while Type II dollars, with an Indian princess motif, were struck in 1854 and 1855, plus in 1856 at the San Francisco Mint only. Type III dollars, featuring a modified portrait of an Indian princess, were made from 1856 through 1889. In the early years, from 1849 through the Civil War, the gold dollar was a workhouse denomination. Those of the Type I design, 13 mm in diameter, were used often in everyday change, and most examples seen today show wear. In 1854 the diameter was enlarged slightly to 15 mm, to make the coin more convenient to handle. The Indian princess design, introduced that year, created problems, as it was not possible for the metal in the dies to flow into the deep recesses of Miss Liberty's portrait on the obverse and at the same time into the central date digits on the reverse, with the result that the majority of pieces seen today are weakly struck on the central two digits (85 in the date 1854, for example). To correct this, the Type II portrait, with Miss Liberty in shallower relief, was created in 1856. Among the three design types of gold dollars, by far the scarcest is the Type II. The total mintage of type II gold dollars amounted to fewer than 2 million pieces. Contrast that to the Type I gold dollar, for which over 4 million coins were struck at the Philadelphia Mint in 1853 alone! Similarly, the Type III gold dollar was minted in quantities far larger than the Type IIThanks for reading my blog, I hope you learned something, and have a great day! Source PCGS CoinFacts

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18 Jan 2021

Penny boxes #3 and #4 and overall wrap-up

Coins | CoinHunter

Hi guys! Today I am going to tell you what I found in boxes #3 and #4 and give you an overall wrap-up of the hunt. So, the finds for box #3 are as follows: 8 wheat pennies, 5 2009s, 4 S mints, and lastly 5 Canadians. For box #4 the finds are as follows: 7 wheats including one 1920, 6 2009s, 6 S Mints, and lastly 6 Canadians including one 1961 YoungHead. So now, time for the final results of the entire hunt for the four penny boxes: 34 wheats including a 1919, 1920, two 1936s, and a 1939-S (which I need for my folder!), 24 2009s, 18 S Mints, 18 Canadians including 2 YoungHeads, Bermudan 1 cent foreign coin (with the Wild boar on the reverse), one dime, and the best find of the hunt, a 1979-D with what appears to be a large rim cud. Thanks for reading, enjoy the pics, and have a great day!Your fellow collector, CoinHunter

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15 Jan 2021

Penny Box #1 and #2 Finds

Coins | CoinHunter

HI! I just wanted to let you guys know that I hunted the first of the four boxes of pennies on Wednesday earlier this week and I didn't make a blog about what I found because I didn't find anything very cool but nevertheless here are the finds: 13 wheats (including one 1936, but it is bent up and dug up), 10 2009s, 8 S mints, 4 Canadians (including 1 1964 Young Head), a 1964 that I am pretty sure is a proof, and lastly, 6 1969-D Floating Roof Errors (This was the first hunt that I looked for them) I also am going to list the the finds of the #2 box which I hunted yesterday: 6 wheats (including a 1919 in the very first roll, and a 1939-S which I need for my folder!), 3 2009s, 3 Canadians, 2 S Mints, 1 dime, two 1969-D Floating Roof Errors, and the best of Both boxes, a 1979-D Rim Cud Error, these two boxes are a good example of "Quality over quantity". Thanks for reading and I will let you know what I find in the last two boxes.

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12 Jan 2021

Box of Nickels

Coins | CoinHunter

I just finished hunting the box of nickels a little while ago, and here are the finds: 2 1943-P war nickels, a gold plated 2004, and the best find, a proof 1972-S. The first and second pics are the war nickels and the last pic is the proof, I will be hunting a penny box tomorrow, the next day, and the next day, and the next day lol, and I will make a blog what I find in each box. Thanks for reading, and see ya!

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12 Jan 2021

My First Half Dollar Box

Coins | CoinHunter

Hi guys! Yesterday I hunted my first half dollar box and got some great finds! First and for-most I found a 1952-D Benjamin Franklin! I also found a 1967 40%er, a gold-plated bicentennial, holed 1974, a 2018-D NIFC (The first year they renewed the cameo and it looks great!), a 2019-P (also with renewed cameo, but it has "The Ring of Death"), and some other NIFCs including: two 2002-Ds a 2003 2004 2009 2012. Now all I have to do is hunt the nickel box and FOUR penny boxes I ordered along with it, I am planning to hunt one every day this week and keeping you guys updated on any more awesome finds! I already have found almost as much silver as I did the entire year 2020! (mainly because of "Covid") Well, that wraps it up for now (pun intended), thanks for reading my blog and happy hunting!

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