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CoinHunter's Blog

09 Mar 2021

Large Cents

Coins-United States | CoinHunter

Hello fellow coin collectors and welcome to another blog!

Alright, I will start by telling how I came about the five large cents I now own. The two cull large cents (no date coronet large cent and a 1848 braided hair cent ) in the bottom of the picture were previously acquired in a trade with @TheNumisMaster, while I bought the other three (1845 braided hair cent, 1838 modified design coronet cent, and a 1856 braided hair cent) for a great price at my local coin shop a couple of days ago. the ones in the top middle and the top right are going straight in to my type set while the the 1845 on the top left is extra (the deal was only if I bought three, plus it is in solid VG shape). Large cents are awesome coins to own because they are odd, many people don't know that cents used to be so large and you are guaranteed to get some questions when you show off any of these coins to any other unknowledgeable persons.

Sadly, large cents became discontinuedin the 1840s because of the fact that they weren't legal tender (only silver and gold coins were legal tender in the United States) and because of this they were refused at most places or accepted at a huge discount which, if you think about it, is even worse. By 1851, it was costing the Mint $1.06 to strike one dollar in 1-cent coins, which means that they were losing money by making them! The diameter of the 1-cent coin was based off of British penny denomination, which is probably why some people (including me sometimes😬) still call our one-cent coins "pennies" which is technically incorrect. Because of the increasing price of minting large cents, they were replaced by small cents like the flying eagle cent,IndianHead cent, and theLincolnCent.

Large cents are awesome coins to own because they are odd, many people don't know that cents used to be so large and you are guaranteed to get some questions when you show off any of these coins to any other unknowledgeable persons.I personally love owning large cents because of their long history of serving America, their (sometimes) beautiful designs, and how cool it feels to hold one.

Thanks for reading this blog and have a great day!



Comments

CopperCollector

Level 4

Nice coins Coin hunter.

Longstrider

Level 6

Nice blog. I like them. I like all the "odd' sizes and denominations. Thanks.

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Large cents are pretty interesting to collect. I don't have many. Maybe I should put some on my list

Mike

Level 7

Those are working coins. They were made strong and did there work in circulation. I like them. For some reason it's probably the only coin my wife likes. Hates all the others. So I had to buy one for her. I told her I would hold on to it for her! Haha. Thanks for the blog. There good to collect!!

Mr. B Coins

Level 4

Great blog with interesting info. I also have just a few Large cents and I really like them. They seem like such a solid coin, with a deep brown color, and so many are so well struck. They are a great addition to a collection. Mr. B

Mokie

Level 6

Best of luck with your collecting efforts. Cull coins are often the best since they served a long life in commerce (their actual true purpose) and still survived various calamities to find their way to you.

Kepi

Level 6

Cool looking coins! Nice review! ; )

Golfer

Level 5

Awesome coins in any condition. I like them. Coins with characters are nice. I don't have any of those. I did buy a couple big english cents recently at a antique shop. They were inexpensive and I liked them. Good pick up.

Stumpy

Level 5

I like em, but somehow I have a larger collection of large English Pennies from when I lived in England. Nice coins!

TheNumisMaster

Level 5

Good stuff! I saw the picture on the blog page, and was like "That coin with the hole in it looks SO familiar..." then I saw that it was your blog (; Thanks for the great overveiw!

"SUN"

Level 5

Large cents are good conversation topic with non collectors.

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