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Conan Barbarian's Blog

09 Apr 2017

Century old coin design

Coins-United States Colonial | Conan Barbarian

The now us government emblem has been a coin design since the 1790s. it first appeared on the copper cent in 1791 (W-10630) but once the us made the mint in Philadelphia the design was used for the dime, quarter, half dollar, and silver dollar. It has never appeared on the cent since the original design on the 1791 Washington cent but it has made rounds in1800-1805 on the Heraldic Eagle half dime1798-1807 Heraldic Eagle dime1804-1807Heraldic Eagle quarter 1892-1916 barber quarter1801-1807Heraldic Eagle half dollar1892-1916 barber half dollar1798-1804Heraldic Eagle silver dollar1796-1807Heraldicquarter eagle1795-1807Heraldichalf eagle1797-1804Heraldic eagle(the 1849-1866 double eagle is a knockoff and more intricatedesign of theHeraldic)also later the eagle was placed in a different position than the one on theHeraldic designs on the capped bust coins. on these the eagle was perchedon the arrows and branchesit was holding in theHeraldic design and it looked as if about to take flight.know 1964-present day the Kennedy half dollar contains the same design, modified a bit from the original but still relaying the same image.the designer of the original 1791 cent,John Gregory Hancock,never knew that his design would have such a large impact on america even a couple of centuries after his deathwe are still using it.

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07 Apr 2017

Century old design

Coins-United States Colonial | Conan Barbarian

The now us government emblem has been a coin design since the 1790s. it first appeared on the copper cent in 1791 (W-10630) but once the us made the mint in Philadelphia the design was used for the dime, quarter, half dollar, and silver dollar. It has never appeared on the cent since the original design on the 1791 Washington cent but it has made rounds in

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