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I think I need professional help...

I have a confession to make.  I have a problem. Since I decided to downsize my collections,  They have probably increased in size by about 15%.We are all stuck in our homes because of covid.  There is very little to do. But, I joined the ANA and so many of my new friends, good role models that they are, have me hooked on roll searching.  And like a good numismatist I try to educate myself.  I learned that the 2017-P Cent is the only Cent with the P mint mark.  It is there to celebrate the 225 anniversary of the Philadelphia Mint.  Now that is a desperate reason for a commemoration.  Now here is where I need help.  I have 2019-P cents coming out of my ears.  How do I stop?  Please don't give me the old song and dance about we should collect what we want.  I don't want to collect them.  I thought I would be rich.  I'm not.  I have another issue, but I'm going to save it.HELP

5 months ago

Two theories and paths to follow. 1. Assume they will have value some day. I have saved every bit of change that comes in the house for 10 years. Some in there will make me glad I did.2. Save the ten % best out of what you got and sell the rest for something you want more. You're on the right track thinking about strategy!

5 months ago

Juggle the percentage saved vs sell, I'm completely in agreement with Bama!

5 months ago

First of all, the year that had a P mintmark is 2017. Second, they are only worth face value right now, though they are pretty cool. Even though they are the only year with a P mintmark, it still had similar mintage numbers as that of the surrounding years. So even in the future they will not be worth much more than the other dates near it. Hope this helps, but if that didn't answer your question, just message me and we can talk about it further

5 months ago

Right, I see.  I faced a similar problem a while back.  As I see it, you have 4 options at the moment.
1) Hold onto them in their state (as I assume, BU rolls?) as they might accumulate value in 50+ years.
2) If you are feeling like you are up for a daunting task, go through every coin and sort them into rolls based on the semi-common cud errors on the reverse (of which there are four main varieties) and pursue to sell each roll individually for $1 as opposed to the 50c you paid for them.
3) Try to sell them online for more than face, although I have to admit, your chances of succeeding are very slim.
4) If you are sick and tired of seeing them, then just take them to your local bank and dump them into circulation.  Outside of the 4 errors, there is really no demand for them whatsoever, and they will not sell above face.


I am also curious about your other issue.  If you would like help, feel free to private message me any time and I would love to give it a look!

5 months ago

@I. R. Bama
Two theories and paths to follow. 1. Assume they will have value some day. I have saved every bit of change that comes in the house for 10 years. Some in there will make me glad I did.2. Save the ten % best out of what you got and sell the rest for something you want more. You're on the right track thinking about strategy! 

5 months ago

Thank all of you for your advice.
It will all help.Mr. B

5 months ago

Save a percentage of what you have. Bring the rest back to the bank. Dump them in the coin machine. When you get the receipt ask the teller for the exact amount you out back. It's a win win. You don't lose anything and you probably will get some good cents to look through. If no machine roll them with your acct number on them. . 

5 months ago

Mike,Thank you for the advice.Mr B

5 months ago

First that isn't really a problem as I see it. They are always worth face. Just think of it as a small price to pay for the hours of enjoyment. It also is giving you good research practice. Cheap price for a needed skill. I would give them a second look for errors, if you are into that. Put them away and forget about them for a while. How can it be a bad thing?? Good luck.

5 months ago
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