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How am I able to tell if a steelie has been recoated in zinc?

I collect steelies, and I want to know how to identify those which have been recoated. How do I do this? Thankyou.

5 years ago

@Quux
I collect steelies, and I want to know how to identify those which have been recoated. How do I do this? Thankyou.
The re-plated/re-processed steel cents will look like chrome and reflect light similar to a mirror. It's an unnatural shininess, as a true, original zinc-plated steel cent will usually have somewhat subdued or satiny luster. See if you can find images of graded steel cents on auction house websites like Heritage or Stacks Bowers, or even eBay. Once you know what the real ones look like, spotting the re-processed steel cents will be a breeze.Often, many of the re-processed steel cents are circulated, so you can see a loss of details, underneath full, brilliant surfaces on these.

5 years ago

Most of the reprocessed steel Penny's will state on the package that they have been reprocessed. If you buy them  loose,they look as new as they came from the mint. Most of them will have marks from circulation. So be careful mike

5 years ago

Thanks for the responses. I'll try that one about the mirror-like appearance.

5 years ago

The 1943 steel cents were always unloved and by being largely reprocessed (or altered) they continue to "get no respect" as Rodney Dangerfield would say. You really have to know the difference when investing in them, and I would leave it up to the professional grading services. Sadly, most folks view them as freaks.

5 years ago

Very helpful responses. :O)


I recently wrote an eBay Buying Guide regarding this issue because I see so many reprocessed 1943 steel Lincoln cents advertised on eBay, usually trying to pass them off as 'gems', 'brilliant uncirculated', or the like. (Although, not always, there are some sellers with scruples who say right up front that the coins are reprocessed.) 

Here is a link to the article:  Reprocessed 1943 Steel Lincoln Cents

If you read anything in the article that is incorrect or could be improved, please let me know as I want it to be as accurate and helpful as possible. 

Thanks!

Mark

5 years ago

@dd27
Very helpful responses. :O)


I recently wrote an eBay Buying Guide regarding this issue because I see so many reprocessed 1943 steel Lincoln cents advertised on eBay, usually trying to pass them off as 'gems', 'brilliant uncirculated', or the like. (Although, not always, there are some sellers with scruples who say right up front that the coins are reprocessed.) 

Here is a link to the article:  Reprocessed 1943 Steel Lincoln Cents

If you read anything in the article that is incorrect or could be improved, please let me know as I want it to be as accurate and helpful as possible. 

Thanks!

Mark

 Hi Mark,

That article/buying guide entry was amazing! So much great info pertaining to all aspects of these coins. I'm glad you mention that the edges of "43 cents lack the zinc plating. Most people don't realize the steel sheets/coils were galvanized, but when the blanks were punched out of this, that left the edges of the steel blanks completely exposed and more apt to rust/oxidize. Again, very good; excellent job! (Now if I could only get most people across America to realize these things aren't worth much above face value, then I'd be able to get a lot more work done here at the ANA HQ!! But answering this question several times a day is job security, so I guess I can't complain too much!) - Sam Gelberd, ANA Numismatic Educator.

5 years ago
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