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Recent NCLT World Coins

Last week I purchased a copy of the 2016 Standard Catalog of World Coins (published by Krause) totaling 1344 pages. This edition consists mainly of recent (post 2000) issues, with the emphasis on special issues, commemoratives, bullion, and crown-like related coins. And I have to say there such is a lot of questionable stuff out there. This includes minor nations, such as the Isle of Man, putting out coins honoring Harry Potter or cats, or the Republic of Benin issuing a Franc honoring marijuana. There are also multiple countries chucking out things such as Signs of the Zodiac sets, colorized Christmas issues, square coins, rectangular coins, and odd denominations (such as $350 gold pieces) at minuscule mintages. These include issues with no regard to national history. Hard core collectors typically shy away from this stuff, and fortunately the U.S. Mint has as well, but it leaves me wondering who will eventually buy all this stuff. Sorry to say, this is where the uninformed or casual collector comes in. It seems the ghost of the Franklin Mint is alive and well and living off shore. Leafing thru this large volume has made me feel a lot better about the U.S. Mint and what they currently issue. 

6 years ago

I have asked that question for so long. Who buy's this stuff. I don't see the value in it at all but someone will. Where there's silver there's a buyer. When I buy a coin it's the workmanship the atr work. After that I start looking into the coin who made it were is it from but with these coins I also ask why! Excellent point you brought up. I've never thought to write about it but I'm glad you took the time. Thanks for the information Mike.

6 years ago

 I agree that anything struck in silver will ultimately find a buyer, no matter if its considered art or not. It's the cupronickel stuff that never really goes away, and ultimately ends up in dealers junk boxes. I was looking thru the book again last night, and if anyone really wants to put together an awesome collection of coins depicting soccer balls, soccer players, or soccer tournaments, there's plenty of stuff out there....

6 years ago

Charles Morgan of Coinweek recently posted a related story concerning the abundance of foreign mints presently producing non-circulating collector coins. Morgan's article, "The Elephant in The Room," can be found on Coinweek.com, which, like Money.org, is also a great website.

6 years ago

Thanks for the information I'll  go look it up. Also in this week's coin world there's an article on over six thousand dimes being returned. Just last week it was a thousand. They say some were returned because of credit card declines. But they don't understand the others. I would be hesitant to buy a returned coin. They said some will be sold they don't know what to do with the others. Again thank you my friend. I know when I see your name I'm  going to pick something up.mike

6 years ago

Most of these themes are just for "entertainment" and they use silver and gold as "enticement".  For example, grandparents will buy these for their grand children expecting the silver/gold aspect as an investment in their future, knowing that they will appreciate the "entertainment" side of the coin in the here and now!

6 years ago

Although I steer clear of this stuff myself I think there is a potential upside. If any of these issues create a new collector then I don't mind. I mean, who hasn't bought something that they regretted later.

6 years ago
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