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numismatic tools & lesson plans for teachers

One of the primary goals of the ANA is to advance the study of money along educational, historical and scientific lines, as well as enhance interest in the hobby among school-age children. The following resources and lesson plans are tools for teachers.

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Email: citc@money.org

    Lesson Plans
    Adopt-A-School Program

    Adopt-A-School Program Educational Kits


    Numismatics is not just a hobby for adults. The future of the hobby is dependent on younger audiences becoming interested in collecting. Through programs like Coins for A’s and the new Adopt-A-School program, the American Numismatic Association is reaching school-age kids to promote curiosity and interest in numismatics.

    The Adopt-A-School program consists of educational kits to be used in a classroom setting. Parents, district representatives or club members can “adopt-a-school” and use the kit to teach students about the importance of numismatics while adhering to the educational curriculum.

    Various lessons included in the kit are geared towards different age groups, from upper elementary grades to high school. The education kit provides the lesson plans that could easily fit into a classroom schedule, meet a teacher’s goals and provide a more in-depth look at numismatics for the kids.


    Each kit includes instructions to all the different lesson plans, a flash drive with presentations, pencils, coins needed with the lessons, reference books, worksheets, plans for an archaeological dig and more. The kit gives the user access to everything needed to successfully run the educational courses.

    Adopt-A-School kits are available for free to ANA member clubs – one kit per ANA club upon request. The kits can also be purchased for $24.95, postage paid.

    For more information or to order a kit, contact Tiffanie Bueschel at tbueschel@money.org or call (719) 482-9816.

    adopt a school
    World War I

    Teach your students about World War I with these educational workbooks filled with challenging and interesting activities.



    Evolution of the U.S. Silver Dollar

    The dollar has been the flagship coin of the United States Mint. Show your students how the development of the dollar and its various designs are a window into our history.


    DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SCRIPT (.DOCX)
    Pick a Year, Any Year

    When we discuss a coin's "value," what do we really mean? This presentation takes you back to the year 1912. Help your students learn how to use a coin as a catalyst to research world, national and local events of any year.

    German Hyperinflation

    The economy is always a current event. Use this presentation to explain the cause of inflation. Show how the events of the First World War led Germany down the path of financial ruin.

    For more information on the history of hyperinflation, visit this link: https://commodity.com/blog/hyperinflation/

    Oh, the State I'm In

    Use the State Quarter Program to help students learn about geography and history with a little letter composition practice included for good measure.

    A Roman Wedding

    A great culminating project after researching Roman coins. Teach how many modern-day wedding customs got their start in Rome.

    Roman Coin Research

    Use ancient Roman coins as a vehicle to recreate an archaeological dig and research rulers of the Roman Empire!

    Current Events on Coins

    The images found on coins reflect society.  Challenge students to design their own coin to commemorate an event!

    Denomination Dilemma

    Ever paid for an item with a twenty cent piece? Use obsolete denominations to help improve student calculations.

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