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a brief history of proofs
A Brief History of United States Proof Coins

Starting in the 1970’s, certain American coins have featured polished fields and unpolished reliefs.

diamond celebration
National Coin Week’s Diamond Anniversary

Take a trip through 74 years of numismatic history and learn how American society impacted the hobby — and vice versa.

ncw 10 notes worth noting
Ten Notes Worth Noting

Paper money reflects America’s economy, as well as our country’s rich history.

a contested space
A Contested Space: Women on U.S. Coins & Paper Money

The female figure was used to represent various ideals of American currency long before women achieved equal rights.

evolution of italian currency
The Evolution of Italian Coinage

Vittorio Emanuele III’s currency testifies to a power struggle between a steadfast king and a growing Fascist regime.

125 years of collecting with the ana
125 Years of Collecting with the ANA

The Association emerged from the challenges of 1986-91 stronger and better able to serve its members and the hobby.

pageant of carolina currency
The Pageant of North Carolina Currency

The distinctive evolution of North Carolina money adds perspective to our understanding of the American experience and the development of numismatics.

evolution of the peace dollar
Evolution of the Peace Dollar

Design modifications extended the die life of these beautiful issues.

Numismatic Library Books
ANA Library Reading List

View this year’s reading list and expand your knowledge of numismatics.

Building a National Identity Through ‘The Noble Savage’

Dr. Jesse Kraft discusses Building a National Identity Through ‘The Noble Savage’, exploring the evolution of Native American representation on U.S. coins.

National Personifications in Numismatics

Michael Shutterly discusses National Personifications in Numismatics, focusing specifically on the evolution of liberty.

Youth Activity

Numismatic enthusiasts grades K-12 can participate in this year’s National Coin Week Youth Activity for the chance to win a fabulous prize!

Learn More

The history of National Coin Week began in 1923, when American Numismatic Association Governor Julius Guttag suggested to the association’s President, Moritz Wormser, that a week-long event should be established “to attract the general public to our hobby and consequently increase our membership, and aid in our science.” That December, the first announcement of a “Coin Week” was made in The Numismatist and scheduled for the week of February 9-16, 1924.

The first National Coin Week was a success, and discussion ensued in 1924 about establishing an annual event. The following year, the name was changed to “Old Coin Week,” and the event was planned for February 15-21. In 1925 Wormser said, “Let us all work together for the accomplishments of the principles for which the American Numismatic Association was founded: To disperse numismatic knowledge . . . to demonstrate that numismatics is an educational and entertaining pursuit . . . and to imbue other collectors with your own enthusiasm and love for the subject.”Coin Week enjoyed successful observances in 1926 and 1927 under President H.H. Yawger.
But, from 1928 to 1938, the association did not actively promote the
event, and it existed in name only. In 1939 member Lee Hewitt of Chicago proposed that the American Numismatic Association reinstate Coin Week
as “National Coin Week.” President J. Henri Ripstra confirmed a new March date and announced that prizes would be given to clubs and individuals
who accomplished the most during the week. In 1942 the observance was
moved to the third full week of April, where it has remained ever since.

Coin Week enjoyed successful observances in 1926 and 1927 under President H.H. Yawger. But, from 1928 to 1938, the association did not actively promote the event, and it existed in name only. In 1939 member
Lee Hewitt of Chicago proposed that the American Numismatic Association reinstate Coin Week as “National Coin Week.” President J. Henri Ripstra confirmed a new March date and announced that prizes would be given to clubs and individuals who accomplished the most during the week. In 1942 the observance was moved to the third full week of April, where it has remained ever since.

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Numismatic news and stories, coin collecting tips, and more. ANA Coin Press is the official blog of the American Numismatic Association.

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